nervous


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Related to nervous: nervous breakdown, nervous system

nervous

[′nər·vəs]
(neuroscience)
Of or pertaining to nerves.
Originating in or affected by nerves.
Affecting or involving nerves.
(psychology)
A state or condition of nervousness.
References in classic literature ?
As soon as he was old enough to sit up alone and toddle about, another affliction, the nervous motion of his body, became apparent.
But these nervous troubles are dreadfully depressing.
Come now," she said, with a little nervous laugh, "he's not so bad as all that.
I've had that, years and years; it's only a nervous affection.
The fatigue was so great that it presently began to make some head against the nervous excitement; while imagining myself wide awake, I would really doze into momentary unconsciousness, and come suddenly out of it with a physical jerk which nearly wrenched my joints apart--the delusion of the instant being that I was tumbling backward over a precipice.
Perry called at Hartfield, the same morning, it appeared that she was so much indisposed as to have been visited, though against her own consent, by himself, and that she was suffering under severe headaches, and a nervous fever to a degree, which made him doubt the possibility of her going to Mrs.
Give your evidence,' said the King; `and don't be nervous, or I'll have you executed on the spot.
The lion is a creature of high nervous development.
I had recovered strength amazingly since my landing, but I was still inclined to be nervous and to break down under any great stress.
In this respect, indeed, I feel nervous, for the reason that it is so difficult to divine what your taste in books may be, despite my knowledge of your character.
But the Butcher turned nervous, and dressed himself fine, With yellow kid gloves and a ruff-- Said he felt it exactly like going to dine, Which the Bellman declared was all "stuff.
His manner was nervous and shy, like that of a sensitive gentleman, and the thin white hand which he laid on the mantelpiece as he rose was that of an artist rather than of a surgeon.