neuroleptic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to neuroleptic: Neuroleptic drugs

neuroleptic

[‚nu̇r·ō′lep·tik]
(pharmacology)
A drug that is useful in the treatment of mental disorders, especially psychoses.
Pertaining to the actions of such a drug.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neuroleptics with marked anticholinergic effects such as chlorpromazine and thioridazine should be avoided.
Kane opposes neuroleptic warning labels, emphasizing instead the need for consistent communication between clinicians and patients.
Little is known about the time it typically takes for neuroleptics to exert their effects on people with long-lasting psychotic symptoms, the scientists add.
0 mg per day of the atypical neuroleptic medication Risperdal[R] for the management of server problem behavior, temper tantrums, irritability, and hyperactivity.
The guest commentary by courageous mental health worker Chuck Areford on March 16, "Antipsychotic drugs are doing harm," sounded an alarm bell that long-term neuroleptics actuallycan shrink frontal lobes and shorten lives.
The Swedish pilot study was created on the basis of a review article summarizing "that in many cases intensive psychosocial support can considerably reduce or make neuroleptic medication unnecessary with no increased risk of adversive effect.
Iam writing to highlight what I believe to be a scandal, concerning the prescription of neuroleptic drugs to people with dementia.
A possible major side effect of antipsychotic therapy is tardive dyskinesia (TD), a neurologic syndrome caused by the long-term use of neuroleptic drugs such as antipsychotics.
argues in a report published by the International Center for the Study of Psychiatry & Psycholog that neuroleptic medications should be severely limited in treating patients with mental illnesses.
Abstract: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a potentially lethal condition that has been described in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) after long-term dopaminergic medications are suddenly stopped or moderately decreased.
Part III is divided into 13 chapters covering Alcohol, CNS Depressants, Opioids, Cocaine, Marijuana, Amphetamines/Sympathomimetic Amines, Hallucinogens, Anticonvulsant and Antiarrhythmic Drugs, Antidepressant Drugs, Neuroleptic Drugs, Carbon Monoxide/ Cyanide, Inhalants, and Metals.