neurotoxin

(redirected from neurotoxic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

neurotoxin

[¦nu̇r·ō′täk·sən]
(biochemistry)
A poisonous substance in snake venom that acts as a nervous system depressant by blocking neuromuscular transmission by binding acetylcholine receptors on motor end plates, or on the innervated face of an electroplax.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mentioned lit review also says that amphetamine appears to be less neurotoxic in younger primates, as compared to older primates.
In the present study, we evaluated the relationship between prenatal residential proximity to agricultural use of a variety of neurotoxic pesticides and neurodevelopment using WISC assessed at 7 y of age because this test provides a more specific and reliable measure of cognition than earlier neurodevelopmental assessments conducted in our cohort and may have greater implications for school performance.
In this series of cases majority of the bites were neurotoxic (71%) compared to the published data from elsewhere, documenting haemotoxic bites to be common in children.
First generation antipsychotics are neurotoxic and impair neuroplasticity via multiple mechanisms.
Cytotoxic spider bites are not associated with neurotoxic effects and are therefore not considered in the differential diagnosis.
Their surprising findings reveal that the peptide is more abundant, more neurotoxic, and exhibits a higher propensity to aggregate than amyloidogenic agents studied in earlier research, suggesting a potential role in new approaches for preventing AD-causing amyloidosis.
This work brings a contribution to the knowledge of "colubrid" venoms by partially isolating and characterising active components responsible for the in vivo neurotoxic action.
More advanced neurotoxic symptoms may include ptosis of one or both eyelids, inability to hold the head up, inability to shift gaze, reduced negative inspiratory force, slurred speech and difficulty swallowing.
Phototherapy helps to reduce the bilirubin level and the risk of brain damage that can occur when bilirubin crosses from the blood into the brain, but it is unclear whether aggressive phototherapy to prevent the neurotoxic effects of bilirubin benefits or harms infants with extremely low birth weight (1000g or less).
Because of the proven neurotoxic effects of organic mercury found in fish, Federal advisory boards have previously recommended that pregnant women limit their fish intake to two or fewer weekly servings--but these data show that the benefits of prenatal fish intake for child development may outweigh the risks.
As a result, FDA will complete a regulatory review of mercury amalgam by June 2009 and has already modified its Web site to state that mercury in dental fillings "may have neurotoxic effects on the nervous systems of developing children and fetus.
If enough accumulates in the body, it's neurotoxic (adversely affecting the nerves and brain) and may cause behavioral changes, memory loss, and a Parkinson-like syndrome.