neutropenia

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Related to neutropenic: neutropenic fever

neutropenia

[′nü·trə‚pē·nē·ə]
(medicine)
Abnormally low number of neutrophils in the peripheral circulation.
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Of less common (<20%) adverse reactions, patients receiving ONIVYDE/5-FU/LV who experienced Grade 3/4 adverse reactions at a[greater than or equal to]2% higher incidence of Grade 3/4 toxicity vs the 5-FU/LV arm, respectively, were sepsis (3%, 1%), neutropenic fever/neutropenic sepsis (3%, 0%), gastroenteritis (3%, 0%), intravenous catheter-related infection (3%, 0%), weight loss (2%, 0%), and dehydration (4%, 2%).
A 27-year-old patient, 9 weeks pregnant and diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, was admitted with a febrile neutropenic attack and initially treated empirically with ceftazidime.
15,16] The latter suggest that a high risk of neutropenic complications is indicated by age >65 years, extensive prior radiotherapy, poor nutrition, previous febrile neutropenia, poor performance status and serious comorbidities.
Cholecystitis in neutropenic patients: Retrospective study and systematic review.
For us, chemotherapy meant Llion being an in-patient for five days at a time; becoming neutropenic and having no resistance to infection then picking one up and becoming horrendously ill.
The growth rates, isolated agents and their antibiotic resistance in febrile neutropenic attacs between 2000-2004 years.
In neutropenic patients, disseminated infections present with shock, pneumonia and respiratory failure, renal failure, nodular erythematous cutaneous lesions, visual loss and central nervous system involvement.
When questioned about factors that may impact chemotherapy, almost all (96 percent) of the nurse respondents agreed that neutropenic infection can cause a delay in treatment, with interruptions in chemotherapy impacting overall effectiveness of the treatment (63 percent).
Most serious infections that develop in neutropenic children receiving chemotherapy are from bacteria carried on the skin or in the gastrointestinal tract.
The patient was not neutropenic, and he had no history of diabetes, but he had recently received chemotherapy, including a low-dose corticosteroid for prostate cancer.
A section exploring special considerations covers prophylactic use of antimicrobial agents and antimicrobial chemotherapy for the neutropenic patient, therapy of selected organ systems, therapy of selected bacterial infections, growth promotion uses of antimicrobial agents, antimicrobial drug residues in foods of animal origin, and regulation of antibiotic use in animals.