Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The French have reported 8 cases of mitochondrial toxicity in uninfected infants with neonatal exposure to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) who developed neurological and developmental abnormalities leading to 2 deaths.
The 3 components of Trizivir, all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, have been previously approved for use in the United States.
Usually one PI is combined with 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), the first class of approved antiretroviral drugs.
If you are having trouble adhering to a standard 3-drug regimen, talk to your doctor about taking 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) only.
Soon the benefit of combining therapies began to become clearer (the combination trend had actually begun earlier with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, NRTIs), and the treatment paradigm of 2 NRTIs and a PI became the unique model by which other therapies were measured.
Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in particular have been associated with lactic acidosis (elevated levels of lactic acid in the blood) and hepatic steatosis (fatty liver).
New reports suggest that zidovudine resistance mutations may be important for resistance to other nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), and a novel mechanism for resistance has been described.
The regimens that have been best documented to work in this context are built on a backbone of ritonavir (Norvir) and saquinavir (Fortovase) along with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs).
Two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) were added afterward (specific drugs not listed).

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