nuke

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nuke

/n[y]ook/ 1. To intentionally delete the entire contents of a given directory or storage volume. "On Unix, "rm -r /usr" will nuke everything in the usr file system." Never used for accidental deletion. Opposite: blow away.

2. Synonym for dike, applied to smaller things such as files, features, or code sections. Often used to express a final verdict. "What do you want me to do with that 80-meg wallpaper file?" "Nuke it."

3. Used of processes as well as files; nuke is a frequent verbal alias for "kill -9" on Unix.

4. On IBM PCs, a bug that results in fandango on core can trash the operating system, including the FAT (the in-core copy of the disk block chaining information). This can utterly scramble attached disks, which are then said to have been "nuked". This term is also used of analogous lossages on Macintoshes and other micros without memory protection.

nuke

To erase.
References in periodicals archive ?
Israel is an undeclared atomic power; yet America would not like to see Iran or any Arab country develop nukes to meet the challenges from her.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Iran blasted the US for its unfounded nuke and terrorism allegations, stressing that Washington should instead act upon its undertakings based on the 2015 nuclear deal with Tehran.
Last week Scotland's First Minister made it clear nukes were a "red line" for the SNP.
Mazari said all countries are continuously upgrading their weapon systems to sustain credibility of their deterrence and she pointed out that it was the US that was developing mini nukes for battlefield use and is suspected of having used depleted uranium weapons in Afghanistan.
If nukes are to ride to the rescue, we need a few on the horizon now.
Given the total lack of success in thwarting any nation that wants a nuke, my confidence in the United Nations' treaty is zero.
Our little nukes wilt in the face of the explosion that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago.
Haqqani, who appeared on a US television to appeal to US citizens to help the thousands of people displaced in the Swat Valley, dismissed fears about Pakistan's nuclear armaments falling into the hands of the extremists saying the nukes were in safe custody.
All Dear Leader Kim has done to impress this administration is produce a neat pile of nukes.
Our concern about nukes seems to apply only to our enemies and not to our friends.
Yes, we and a few of our good friends have nukes, too, but ours are peaceful nukes.
Despite dire warnings that the nation is vulnerable to terrorists possessing "suitcase nukes," the U.