oboe

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oboe

(ō`bō, ō`boi) [Ital., from Fr. hautbois] or

hautboy

(ō`boi, hō`–), woodwind instrument of conical bore, its mouthpiece having a double reed. The instruments possessing these general characteristics may be referred to as the oboe family, which includes the English hornEnglish horn,
musical instrument, the alto of the oboe family, pitched a fifth lower than the oboe and treated as a transposing instrument. It has a pear-shaped bell, giving it a soft, melancholy tone.
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, the bassoonbassoon
, double-reed woodwind instrument that plays in the bass and tenor registers. Its 8-ft (2.4-m) conical tube is bent double, the instrument thus being about 4 ft (1.2 m) high. It evolved from earlier double-reed instruments in the 16th cent.
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, and the contrabassooncontrabassoon,
large, deep-toned instrument of the oboe family, also called double bassoon. Its tube, over 16 ft (5 m) long, is doubled upon itself four times. It was first made by Hans Schreiber of Berlin in 1620.
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 or double bassoon. The oboe was developed in the mid-17th cent. in France from various older double-reed instruments, which the oboe, with its greater expressive and dynamic range, largely displaced by the 18th cent. It was soon used in the orchestra, possibly as early as 1657, and was the principal orchestral woodwind throughout most of the 18th cent., the flute and clarinet gaining an equal footing only late in the century. It was also a favorite solo instrument, and it has an extensive solo and chamber-music literature from the baroque and early classical periods. In the 19th cent., although retaining its importance in the orchestra, it was rarely employed for solo purposes. In the 20th cent. its solo use has increased. It was gradually improved mechanically, notably in the 19th cent., and the Conservatory model, developed in France, is most used now. The oboe d'amore, pitched a minor third lower than the oboe, was much used in the baroque era, especially by J. S. Bach. It fell into disuse thereafter, but has been revived in the 20th cent. Its tone is less brilliant than that of the oboe. The oboe da caccia is an early version of the English horn, pitched a fifth lower than the oboe and therefore a transposing instrument. Oboes of this size were known by 1665, and Purcell scored for one in his Dioclesian (1691). A curved form, often with the present instrument's characteristic bulbous bell, appeared in the 18th cent. and was employed occasionally by Bach, Haydn, and Mozart. See also shawmshawm
, double-reed woodwind instrument used in Europe from the 13th through the 17th cent. The term denotes a family of instruments of different sizes. The shape and tone of the soprano shawm are comparable to those of the oboe, of which it is a precursor.
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Oboe

 

a reed woodwind musical instrument. It originated in France in the second half of the 17th century from an instrument of the Middle Ages, the shawm (Schalmei).

The modern oboe is a straight wooden pipe consisting of a top joint, a middle joint, and a bell. It has 25 holes, of which 22-24 are covered by keys. The instrument uses a double reed made from a special type of cane. Two systems of oboes exist—German and French. The oboe of the French system, which has a better key construction and is distinguished by the purity of its intonation, is widespread; its sound is piercing, with a nasal timbre. The oboe occupies an important place among the woodwind instruments used in symphonic and operatic orchestras. It is also used as a solo and ensemble instrument. Types of oboes include the tenor oboe, or English horn; and the alto oboe, or oboe d’amore.

S. IA. LEVIN

Oboe

[′ō‚bō]
(navigation)
An electronic navigation system utilizing a single-path round-trip system for determination of transmission times and distance; used for bombing in World War II.

oboe

a woodwind instrument of the family that includes the bassoon and cor anglais, consisting of a conical tube fitted with a mouthpiece having a double reed. It has a penetrating nasal tone. Range: about two octaves plus a sixth upwards from B flat below middle C
References in periodicals archive ?
Since her retirement from teaching oboe at the University of Cincinnati's College-Conservatory of Music, Sara Bloom has helped preserve and share her late husband's musical legacy via The Robert Bloom Collection; a forty-two volume set of scores and parts (including some original compositions by Bloom as well as his edited versions of key works in the oboe repertoire) and the seven-CD anthology The Art of Robert Bloom, the former reviewed by oboist Daniel Stolper for this journal in September 2001.
Chadwick also referred her to professional oboist and reed-maker Joseph Halko of Westboro.
Her accomplishment gained a scholarship to the Royal College of Music, where she studied under Leon Goossens, Liverpool-born and widely regarded as the country's greatest oboist.
He has been guest principal oboist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and has performed with the Academy of St.
I very much doubt that many oboists have this concerto in their repertoire .
We oboists do not have concertos from Brahms or Beethoven, our core repertoire begins with Richard Strauss's concerto, completed after World War II.
The 168 representative reeds (some oboists contributed two) are shown both in reflected light and in silhouette (back-lighted) and are organized alphabetically by country and, within each country, alphabetically by surname.
In his discussion of French music before 1726, he correctly points out that professional players were usually both oboists and flutists.
That the excellent playing of the rest of the Consort, particularly oboists Katerina Spreckelsen and Alexandra Bellamy, was followed by Wallfisch's fireworks show must take nothing from them.
You can't make a living with solo playing, as is clear from the careers of the leading European oboists.
All of this music, more oboe music than I had ever seen in one package, is associated with the legendary Robert Bloom, generally considered to be one of the greatest oboists of his generation and perhaps of all time," in the words of Gordon Emerson of the New Haven Register (26 March 1980).
Principal Oboist Eileen Whalen will be heard performing the beautiful Concerto for Oboe d'amore by J.