observed fire


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observed fire

[əb′zərvd ′fīr]
(ordnance)
Fire for which the points of impact or burst can be seen by an observer on the ground, in aircraft, or on a naval vessel; it can be controlled and adjusted on the basis of the observations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The easily disrupted wires meant that observed fire was more likely to succeed at the opening of an offensive rather than toward its end.
Clearly during World War I, aerial observed fire in real time was a tool available to battery commanders only under very special circumstances.
He would only fly when the tactical situation dictated an observed fire aerial mission.
Whereas in World War I a single battery could concentrate its guns on a target using observed fire, by the early 1940s the Field Artillery School had developed a procedure for quickly massing the fire of an entire division (and later co rps) of artillery upon a single target.
The new artillery system was designed for a much faster tempo of operations than World War I, but it rested on the assumption that observed fire would be the primary mode of delivery and that American artillery would bring its guns to bear in real time, not the elapsed time of map fire.
This, of course, would handle the long range problem of securing pilots but not the short range difficulty of providing observed fire to support either the Central Task Force or the Eastern Assault Force.
However, the OPFOR regularly integrates effective observed fires on existing and reinforcing obstacles with devastating effects on rotation unit maneuver.