obsession

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obsession

Psychiatry a persistent idea or impulse that continually forces its way into consciousness, often associated with anxiety and mental illness

obsession

[əb′sesh·ən]
(psychology)
Persistence of or anxious preoccupation with an idea or emotion recognized as unreasonable by the individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
UITs with obsessional themes involving contamination, dirt, harm, injury, sex, religion, etc.
The fragmentation and atomization of character traits as suggested in the "five-factor model" of personality is a recent example of diagnosticians playing in the obsessional sandbox.
It requires all of us to be obsessional about our practice lest complacency leads to a resurgence of avoidable deaths.
In either case, clear and concentrated thinking about a brief, from the point of view of client, user and those who will make the building, is the foundation for good architecture; in the case of particularly challenging tasks it will also require from the lead architect a state of mind bordering on the obsessional (generally temporary) in relation to making the most of the challenge.
This is, in short, an obsessional novel--and thus it is well suited to please those individuals who might admit to being obsessive readers of novels.
Freud's ideas about obsessional neurosis as a neurosis where those affected are possessed with a force of super-moral obligation are then examined.
Hand washing and checking relieves the anxiety in the short term but as soon as this stops the obsessional worries return.
The gestures look intentional, like a mimed language, then become repetitive and obsessional as rock music by The Cramps replaces Bach.
The first category is obsessional, which includes simple obsessional and love obsessional.
Here Beckmann invented several things that stuck: a way of building the composition from the figures themselves, who, like the beams and struts of all old mine, support the rectangle of the canvas; an elusive kind of storytelling that adds up visually but not quite narratively; and a vocabulary of obsessional objects--candles, horns, jutting elbows, soles of feet, theater stages, and mullioned windows, to be joined in later works by cigarettes, newspapers, flying fish, crystal balls, stringed instruments, succulent plants, ladders, swords, and dinner jackets.
Tate uses a tangent of this argument for the necessity of the common thing in literature to explain Edgar Allen Poe's wild, obsessional stories and poems.