obstacle clearance

obstacle clearance

[′äb·stə·kəl ‚klir·əns]
(navigation)
In air operations, the vertical distance between the lowest and the authorized height of operation.

obstacle clearance

In air operations, the vertical distance between the lowest and the authorized height of operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
If I have a choice in VMC, I would use the RNAV (GPS) approach because it would guarantee obstacle clearance.
Renault said that, due to its pulling power, manoeuvrability, and obstacle clearance, the K Xtrem is well suited for urban materials delivery, earthmoving applications, and concrete and fertiliser transportation.
The FAA evaluates straight-in and offset visual segments for obstacles in both a 34:1 obstacle clearance surface (OCS) and a 20:1 OCS.
The current legal requirements on safety, fire safety, earthquake safety, obstacle clearance, etc.
The standard ride height is 250mm but the obstacle clearance is up to 323mm off-road on its big, rugged, Michelin tubeless tyres.
But it's always worth reminding ourselves just how capable the Freelander is when really put to the test with a wading depth of 500mm, obstacle clearance up to 210mm and approach and departure angles that are not for the faint-hearted.
This distance was calculated for the leading limb during foot strike, after the obstacle clearance, and for the trailing limb during stance phase, before the obstacle clearance.
Enthusiasts will note that it boasts obstacle clearance up to 210mm, a maximum wading depth of 500mm, can handle off-road approach angles of up to 31 degrees, and 34 degrees on departure.
Enthusiasts will note that it boasts obstacle clearance up to 210mm, a maximum wading depth of 500mm can handle off-road approach angles of up to 31 degrees and 34 degrees on departure.
It usually lists optional extras and performance stats, but the Discovery one lists wading depths of 700mm, obstacle clearance of 310mm and off-road approach angles of 37.
The battalion obstacle clearance was strictly a manual process.
The TSB is now asking Transport Canada (TC) to require that approach charts used by pilots to depict the optimal path to be flown rather than the line joining the obstacle clearance altitudes which is currently shown and that the stabilised constant descent angle approach technique be used by Canadian operators that conduct non-precision instrument approach procedures.