offence

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offence

(US), offense
American football
a. the team that has possession of the ball
b. the members of a team that play in such circumstances
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 2--Incidents, Offenses, Victims, and Known Offenders, by Offense Type, 2012
The FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program collects the number of offenses that come to the attention of law enforcement for violent crime and property crime, as well as data regarding clearances of these offenses.
Article 79 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) provides the basic rule for lesser included offenses (LIOs): "An accused may be found guilty of an offense necessarily included in the offense charged or of an attempt to commit either the offense charged or an offense necessarily included therein.
How all the players are grouped together via a color pattern--Black, Blue, Green, White, Orange, Red, Gray, plus two offenses: Coming from Behind and the I Formation in the Multiple Offense.
They may be divided into substantive offenses and conspiracy offenses.
Property crimes include offenses such as burglary, theft, forgery/fraud and vandalism.
These are just three of the many cases that illustrate how federal criminal law has overstepped its proper bounds, prescribing draconian punishments for offenses that should be handled at the state level or that should not be considered crimes at all.
Violent offenses include murder, manslaughter, rape, robbery, assault, and other aggressive crimes.
Including the offenses surrounding the events of September 11, 2001, preliminary data show that the 2001 Crime Index remains at the 2 percent increase from the 2000 figure; the volume of violent crime increased .
10) Although they developed this model for the adult criminal justice system, with its elaborate gradations of offenses and levels of appeals, their framework can be applied to juvenile justice as well.
Moreover, noninstitutionalized mentally retarded offenders of both sexes in a large Swedish sample were convicted, on average, of as many crimes and for the same types of offenses as nonretarded offenders, report Anne G.