officious

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Related to officiously: typically, truculently

officious

Diplomacy informal or unofficial
References in classic literature ?
Mann ushered the beadle into a small parlour with a brick floor; placed a seat for him; and officiously deposited his cocked hat and can on the table before him.
Having officiously deposited the gentleman's boots right and left at his feet, and the lady's shoes right and left at hers, he backed towards the door.
I say, measter," said the boy, pulling officiously at the clerk's coat, "there be summun up yander in the church.
A negro lad, startled from his sleep by the officer's voice - he knows it well - but comforted by his assurance that he has not come on business, officiously bestirs himself to light a candle.
Miller, the vicar, and some mothers and other chaperons looked on and consumed light refreshments, which were brought out upon trays by Smilash, who had borrowed and put on a large white apron, and was making himself officiously busy.
The fact that Chuck's fandom is perceived as a keen and savvy media planner that officiously sells viewership to advertisers illustrates, once again, how fans draw on their cultural and social capital to carry out labor that can directly benefit the networks and creators in charge of the shows they love.
Despite the highly proscriptive language of the letter, and the officiously absurd titles of the bureaucrats who wrote it, defenders of the directive are quick to insist that this is not "law," but merely a series of suggestions about how schools and universities can become more "inclusive.
Wordsworth, of course, never traveled to America, so he officiously includes a note declaring the textual origin of this image: "The splendid appearance of these scarlet flowers which are scattered with such profusion over the Hills in the Southern parts of North America is frequently mentioned by Bartram in his Travels.
Man has a status and he officiously achieves through education.
officiously to interfere, and sue out a mandamus in a matter of
No graven images may be Worshipp'd, except the currency: Swear not at all; for, for thy curse Thine enemy is none the worse: At church on Sunday to attend Will serve to keep the world thy friend: Honour thy parents; that is, all From whom advancement may befall: Thou shalt not kill; but need'st not strive Officiously to keep alive: Do not adultery commit; Advantage rarely comes of it: Thou shalt not steal; an empty feat, When it's so lucrative to cheat: Bear not false witness; let the lie Have time on its own wings to fly: Thou shalt not covet; but tradition Approves all forms of competition.
US Ambassador Philip Goldberg, already meddling in the internal affairs of another sovereign state, only follows the supercilious demeanor of his predecessors, officiously telling our President what he thinks on both domestic and international issues.