Omniscience


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Omniscience

Ea
shrewd god; knew everything in advance. [Babylonian Myth.: Gilgamesh]
God
knows all: past, present, and future. [Christianity and Judaism: NCE, 1098–1099]
Santa Claus
he knows who has been bad or good. [Western Folklore: Misc.]
Sphinx
ancient Egyptian symbol of all-knowingness. [Heraldry: Halberts, 38]
References in periodicals archive ?
That The Market is not at all displeased by downsizing or a growing income gap, or can be gleeful about the expansion of cigarette sales to Asian young people, should not cause anyone to question its ultimate omniscience.
In an uncharacteristically indifferent (or possibly ironic) response, Genette proposes to redefine omniscience as "the well-known 'viewpoint of God,' or of Sirius, about which people periodically wonder whether it is indeed a point of view" (Revisited 73).
As our guide, he first gains mastery over the way he tells the story and then over the events within his account: Significantly, the narrator's bid for omniscience precedes his actual escape plan and successful departure with Reb.
Structurally, the book is conveniently divided into four periods, each with a specific focus: 1890-1918, dealing with the descent from decadent estheticism and treating concepts like omniscience, modernism, and realism; 1918-45, which marks the beginning of the modernist revolution with the wave of New Criticism, starting with T.
Their finite boundaries and measurable distance from one another produced a sense of spatial and temporal displacement that inspired delusions of grandeur, feelings of omniscience, and the desire to contemplate the transcendent on the part of the spectator.
Victorian fiction scholar Audrey Jaffe, author of Vanishing Points: Dickens, Narrative, and the Subject of Omniscience, covers the period's most outstanding works, including Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Shelley's Frankenstein, Dickens's Great Expectations, James's Portrait of a Lady and Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground, to discover how the genre shaped literature from that time up to the experimental literature of today.
Science and omniscience in nineteenth-century literature.
Written with abiding compassion and the omniscience of an astute insider, yet set against the bleak and timely backdrop of clinical pathos, Sarcophagus is a compelling journey of discovery and a descent into the netherworld of modern medicine as it crosses the threshold of history.
Issues such as the relationship between freedom and omniscience (let alone Providence), human/divine relationships, and the like are suddenly illuminated and clarified as they have rarely been in the history of Christian doctrines.
When the unconditioned is obtained, the mind functions in its native omniscience, and reality is thoroughly understood.
Far from a retrospective, controlled account of the characters' past and the Middle Passage, Beloved presents a thoroughly confusing, disjointed, and ambiguous story whose narrator is an elusive, roving, multivocal speaker(s) of relative omniscience who often inhabits characters in the first person and shifts tenses and levels of discourse unexpectedly like an unknown source of gossip.
Often speaking directly to the audience, the men talk in a patois of first-person confession and third-person omniscience.