omnivore


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

omnivore:

see carnivorecarnivore
, term commonly applied to any animal whose diet consists wholly or largely of animal matter. In animal systematics it refers to members of the mammalian order Carnivora (see Chordata).
..... Click the link for more information.
.

omnivore

[′äm·nə‚vȯr]
(zoology)
An organism that eats both animal and vegetable matter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other scholars uphold the contemporary viability of the homology perspective, questioning the evidence for and utility in the notion of a class-delimited musical omnivore (e.
2007), Chan and Goldthorpe (2005), and Montgomery and Robinson (2008), to name a few, there has until recently been little empirical research into the application of omnivore theory in South Africa.
It's at that point that we realised that just about all the animals we omnivores eat are vegetarian.
As expected, they found that the vegan volunteers ate less protein than the omnivore volunteers.
To get an idea of what omnivore chef training includes, visit the American Culinary Federation website at www.
The Hatchet Job award was established in 2011 by literary website The Omnivore to honor "the angriest, funniest, most trenchant'' review published in a newspaper or magazine.
But the badger has a cuddly image that belies its nature as an omnivore that kills and eats hedgehogs and devours eggs.
History argues in favor of the omnivore argument, considering that humans have eaten meat for 2.
He is the perfect kind of critic: an enthusiast, a discerning thinker, and a cultural omnivore.
Music's multi-tasking omnivore is never one to miss an opportunity for a profile-enhancing collaboration.
Based on other oviraptorosaurs and other small maniraptorans, it was perhaps an omnivore, eating small animals, including insects, as well as leaves and fruit," said Naish.
Professor Tim White, from the University of California in Berkeley, US, one of the leaders of the team that discovered the fossils, said, 'Australopithecus became a superior omnivore, able to eat tubers and roots with more fibre and grit, adapting it better to times of scarcity during periods of extended drought.