oncogene

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oncogene

any of several genes, first identified in viruses but present in all cells, that when abnormally activated can cause cancer

oncogene

[′äŋ·kō‚jēn]
(genetics)
A gene whose mutation can lead to cancer in experimental animals and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
This same cross-species mapping approach holds promise for identifying oncogenes located in large regions of chromosomal gain that are a feature of other adult and pediatric cancers," Gilbertson said.
Number of oncogene inhibitor for treatment of different malignancies is increasing every year due to which their market shares are expected to increase several folds in coming years.
Subsequent work revealed that let-7 regulates a number of other oncogenes, including CCND2 (cyclin D2), CDK6 (cyclin-dependent kinase 6), CDC25 [cell division cycle 25 homolog C (S.
Jackson, has identified a new oncogene, which is a gene that contributes to the development of cancer, named FAM83B.
In this study we have shown that the RRM is capable of identifying the difference between oncogenes and proto-oncogenes and thus, identifying general "cancerous" feature within oncogene protein primary structures.
Garraway and coworkers have developed a system that uses high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays to screen a sample of a patient's tumor DNA for 238 known mutations in 17 of the best-established oncogenes at a cost of about $65.
Mutations in genes linked to cancer do not occur randomly but arise most often in certain regions of the oncogene (cancer-causing gene).
Amplified oncogenes in human cancer can then be rapidly identified by integrating this database with whole-genome gene expression analysis.
activation of oncogenes or deletion of tumor-suppressor genes that control the production of angiogenesis regulators).
In return, Amgen will gain access to Tularik's Oncogene Discovery Program.
Directed complementation allows rapid production of murine primary tumors driven by an oncogene of choice.
The research specifically examines the roles of the p53 tumour suppressor and the oncogene, NF-kappaB.