optical lattice


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optical lattice

[‚äp·tə·kəl ′lad·əs]
(optics)
A regular pattern of microscopic traps for atoms, formed by the light forces in an interference pattern formed by laser beams.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dynamical properties can provide characteristic fingerprints that allow to identify novel phases in newly synthesized materials and optical lattice systems.
tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=7999&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bday%5D=14&tx_news_pi1%5Bmonth%5D=2&tx_news_pi1%5Byear%5D=2017&cHash=809615d614825130de71862a1e23061d) optical atomic clock is also called an optical lattice clock because it (https://www.
Some of the most accurate clocks on the planet are devices known as optical lattice clocks.
This clock holds strontium atoms in a linear array of pancake-shaped traps formed by laser beams, called an optical lattice.
This optical lattice holds the atoms fast, like eggs in a crate, while gently shaking them.
Hidetoshi KATORI for "Invention of the Optical Lattice Clock and its Development"
The physicists built their ytterbium clocks using about 10,000 rare-earth atoms cooled to 10 microkelvin (10 millionths of a degree above absolute zero) and trapped in an optical lattice made of laser light.
Dholakia, "Microfluidic sorting in an optical lattice," Nature, Vol.
His team operates a ytterbium optical lattice clock, one of the latest types of souped-up atomic timepieces.
Topics include electron transport in carbon nanotubes, scattering and pairing in cuprate superconductors, spintronics, single molecule nanomagnets, Fermi-Hubbard physics with atoms in an optical lattice, first-principles calculations of complex metal-oxide materials, x-ray diffraction microscopy, physics of cellular movements, molecular theories of segmental dynamics and mechanical response in deeply supercooled polymer melts and glasses, rheology of soft materials, the mechanics and statistics of active matter, and dynamics of simple cracks.
One candidate for such a computer is a so-called optical lattice, in which ultracold atoms are coaxed by strategically placed laser beams into a grid arrangement, rather like eggs in an egg carton.
Recent neutron inelastic scattering measurements at the NCNR have demonstrated a direct relationship between the lowest-frequency transverse optical lattice vibration and the polar nanostructure, thereby resolving a long-standing discrepancy between prior x-ray and neutron results.