organic

(redirected from organicity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

organic

1. of, relating to, derived from, or characteristic of living plants and animals
2. of or relating to animal or plant constituents or products having a carbon basis
3. of or relating to one or more organs of an animal or plant
4. of, relating to, or belonging to the class of chemical compounds that are formed from carbon
5. of or relating to the essential constitutional laws regulating the government of a state

Organic

Forms that have a structure that perfectly fulfills their own functional requirements; intellectually integrated by a systematic connection and coordination of the parts to the whole.

organic

[ȯr′gan·ik]
(organic chemistry)
Of chemical compounds, based on carbon chains or rings and also containing hydrogen with or without oxygen, nitrogen, or other elements.

organic

Said of a material or compound derived from vegetable or animal life.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypothesis: The (a) degree of strategic orientation and structural organicity, (b) the strength of cultural norms favoring entrepreneurial behavior, (c) the strength of the organization's commitment to resources and growth, and (d) the extent to which the organizational reward systems encourage entrepreneurial behavior are positively related to (a) the strength of the organization's competitive capability and (b) the realization of strategic repositioning, (c) to sales growth, (d) higher employee growth, and (c) equity growth.
A very interesting discussion may appear here concerning the notion of persistence and the notion of organicity or, even more complicated, between the three notions which appeared: persistence, organicity, essence.
The course description says, among other profundities, "Stupidity is neither ignorance nor organicity.
The thrust of Turvey's reading of Vertov's film comes from his recuperation of the notion of organicity for the filmmaker's thought, which is often overlooked given the prominent role that machinism or the fusion of man and machine plays in Man with a Movie Camera.
It expands the critical potential of the study of translation since, as Rose believes, translation exhibits realities about cultural and political history at large and about the "oscillations" of cultural history; it should be seen in its organicity and as part of the (human) cultural continuum (p.
Saying that "it takes a village" certainly echoes the communitarianism and organicity of the Volk, as does using children's welfare as a wedge issue for expanding the state's control over parents and families, but here too Goldberg strains too hard to made the finer details fit.
His "conception" of maternity presents a unique blending of a Renaissance interest in the immortalizing potential of poetic parthenogenesis, a Romantic fascination with the organicity of procreation and childbirth, and a Victorian partiality to the morbid aesthetics of death and maternity, fueled by a deeply personal drive to push the metaphor to its outermost limits.
98) The essayist reminds us that in spite of all theories about fragment (ranging from the romantic aesthetics of the fragment to Nietzschean disdain for unity and totality) it is impossible to avoid the fact that Pessoa faced his fragmentary writing with undisguised anguish and that he strived for unity, for closed works, for organicity, as some (strangely neo-Aristotelian) propositions clearly show: 'todas as cousas tem um principio, um meio e um fim' [everything has a beginning, a middle and an end'].
Pseudo-MS has been previously described in a case series of six patients where the author of the report concluded none of the cases seem probable from laboratory tests or clinical observation, primarily because the clinical history and physical findings were inconsistent with organicity and because no laboratory data were confirmatory.
Moreover, Ed himself constantly threatens to depart from his self-imposed vow of silence, as when he shares with Frank his strange epiphany about the organicity of hair and when he amusingly digresses on the particulars of popular haircuts (which are themselves tempting and complex intertexts).
Further, Howarth bases his central reading strategy on an intelligent principle, one which not only points to the virtues of some unfairly neglected writers, but which suggests as well that the high moderns could have been a little more nuanced in their own self-justifications: "Language is not language unless it is to some degree formulated, and the concepts of accuracy, sincerity and organicity are meaningless without the threat of some kind of formula" (40).
Similarly, on design tests (Visual Reproduction, Memory for Design Test) schizophrenics showed signs of organicity as perseveration, rotation, tremors etc.