orthopnea


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orthopnea

[ȯr′thäp·nē·ə]
(medicine)
A condition in which there is difficulty in breathing except when sitting or standing upright.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Before starting the trial, one patient suffered from hypotension; two patients had heart dysfunction (symptoms of dyspnea, orthopnea, or paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, accompanied by a left ventricular ejection fraction <40%); one patient suffered from refractory angina and needed early invasive therapy before the study; one patient had end-stage renal failure; and four patients were lost to follow-up after the procedure.
In December 2007, he had again the adynamia, anorexia, vomitus, diarrhea, fever, shills, sweating, dyspnea and orthopnea.
Our patient was a 56 years old African American female, who presented to the emergency room with a two week history of progressive exertional dyspnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, orthopnea and bilateral lower extremity edema.
Post-surgical examination included the evaluation of body temperature, pulse rate, respiratory rate and chest resonance as well as looking out for signs of dyspnoea, orthopnea, hyperpnoea, shock, and cyanosis Statistical analysis: The data were analyzed by computer programme SPSS using.
This information demonstrates that the patient experiences orthopnea.
Myocarditis may be clinically silent until sudden death occurs, or it may present with dyspnea, fatigue, exercise intolerance, palpitations, syncope or presyncope, or symptoms of congestive heart failure such as orthopnea [39,60].
While still in post-anesthetic care unit (PACU), she felt better and pulmonary auscultation showed basilar crackles and mild cyanosis (pulse oximetry showed a SPO2 of about 80-83%) with moderate dyspnea and orthopnea after receiving furosemide, aminophylline and oxygen through facemask for two hours.
She denies orthopnea or paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea.
So far, the most effective method of achieving the head elevated laryngoscopy position is by using a pre-manufactured device as described by Rich (2004 p265), '(it) eases the work of breathing for those patients who cannot lay flat secondary to obesity-induced orthopnea.
The patients presented with a wide variety of symptoms including embolic phenomenon (50%), shortness of breath, or orthopnea (30%), though some were asymptomatic (10%).