oubliette


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

oubliette

a dungeon the only entrance to which is through the top

oubliette

A secret dungeon in the deepest parts of a medieval stronghold, having as its only entry a trapdoor through which prisoners were dropped.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier in "Self-Portrait," Merrill had discovered among trinkets in a new-age boutique "lucite coffins / For sapphire waves that crest, break, and recede"; the wave of the final line, in its fluid movement, suggests not only "the motion of the spirit [contained] in the measure of the poem," as Vendler notes (Last 134), but also the mind's play within the failing body and the liquid oubliette that threatens and allures the speaker of "Losing the Marbles.
Dan Simon, 32, spokesman for the Oubliette Group, said:"We are using the space to raise awareness of the Belarus Free Theatre who performed at the Young Vic recently in London to draw attention to the oppression of free speech in Belarus.
She begins this lesson very soon after entering the Labyrinth; she gives Hoggle her bracelet in payment for leading her out of the oubliette, which he was going to do anyway.
FURTHER to my letter on James Bond (Mailbag, November 1), I wish to correct my mistake as Oubliette is taken from You Only Live Twice and not On Her Majesty's Secret Service.
There will always be a few who would like our prisons to resemble an oubliette, but unless we wish to return to mediaeval standards of human rights we have to look at creating something a little more enlightened.
5) His own obsession with the oubliette betrays a much broader romantic view of the prison, which was increasingly seen, despite its gaudy horrors, as a place of silence, blindness, and opacity.
After Krymov's own arrest and imprisonment in the Lubyanka (we knew this was coming), there is a haunting description of the kind of fluorescent oubliette that uncannily prefigures Solzhenitsyn: "He went up in a brightly lit lift and walked down a long carpeted corridor, past a row of doors with round spy holes.
Robbery, injury and disappearing into the oubliette of Central Asia were never far from actuality; as Thubron says, "danger was cumulative .
Indeed it entered the oubliette of rejected Reports, to become almost entirely forgotten.
When Osama bin Laden and a few hundred other fanatics are dead or locked away in the oubliette at Guantanamo Bay, Halliburton and its corporate peers will still be shaking down the American government for subsidies and control of Middle East oil.
The first computer networks were riddled with games called Dungeon, Oubliette (French for dungeon), and the like, often written by players for fun and distributed for free.
The O'Carrolls had a penchant for poisoning their enemies at banquets, then pitching them down an oubliette (it's still visible) in the tower to land on spikes below.