outbreeding

(redirected from outcrossing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

outbreeding

[′au̇t‚brēd·iŋ]
(genetics)
References in periodicals archive ?
High genetic diversity has been observed in homosporous pteridophytes with high degree of outcrossing (Maki and Asada, 1998; Kang et al.
2009) Modelling the outcrossing between genetically modified and conventional maize with equation discovery.
Species that self-fertilize autonomously last longer in anthesis; perhaps, to give the opportunity for outcrossing.
They genetically engineered the worms, which normally practice a combination of both selfing and outcrossing, to reproduce either just by selfing or just by outcrossing.
The association of gene diversity and population density is also congruent with both outcrossing and selfing, with less dense populations having a higher proportion of selfers.
Establishing this was necessary to ensure that donor pollinia used in the hand-pollination experiment were composed of outcrossing gametes.
Researchers had thought that selfing does not diminish the frequency of outcrossing, because self-pollination uses such a small portion of the pollen pool, Harder explains.
But this genetic weakness has been overcome by outcrossing them with other blood lines, that is to say with mares from the few stud farms abroad where Dartmoor ponies are bred'.
While controversy exists concerning the origin of the "dilute" gene that produces the silver coloration--whether it has always been present in the breed, or is the result of outcrossing to another breed--it was not our intention to imply silver Labs are not purebred.
Mechanisms promoting outcrossing were explored and verified through coordination of laboratory and field studies (e.
All but one of the unmodified flowers in the control group produced a mature anthocarp filled with a normal achene, indicating that with a combination of self-pollination and outcrossing, T.
It has outcrossing reproductive behavior--a process that introduces unrelated genetic material into a breeding line, which reduces the probability of individual palms being subject to disease or genetic abnormalities.