ouzel


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Related to ouzel: water ouzel, ring ouzel

ouzel

, ousel
1. short for ring ouzel or water ouzel (see dipper)
2. an archaic name for the (European) blackbird
References in periodicals archive ?
Only the ring ouzel leaves Great Britain for long migrations.
In 1695, Dublin merchants sent the large galley Ouzel with oars, brass canons, and 37 men to trade in the eastern Mediterranean.
The American dipper, called the water ouzel in England, is indeed singular: It is America's only aquatic songbird, at home darting about in the air or walking on the bottom of a frothy stream looking for food.
24 /PRNewswire/ -- This season's whitewater rafting on the Owyhee River promises to be the best in six years, according to Kent Wickham of Oregon's Ouzel Outfitters.
Here you may also catch sight of abundant mule deer, a belted kingfisher, a small gray water ouzel, even an occasional river otter.
It consists of rocky upland, sessile oak woodland and an area of heath and bog, which is home to merlin, peregrine, hen harrier, black grouse and ring ouzel.
Although the project is concentrating on connecting and improving habitats, the areas also support a range of upland species that will benefit, such as curlew and ring ouzel, mountain bumblebee and large heath butterfly.
Species suffering large population drops include the curlew, golden plover, chough, peregrine and ring ouzel.
Although today an ouzel is a kind of thrush, in Shakespeare's time this was the name also given to a male blackbird.
uk Birds of prey and others such as the ring ouzel breed in Craig Cerrig Gleisaid; spot rare nocturnal birds include owls and nightjar at night; survey the sensory adaptations of endangered British bats; forage for common lizards, adders and slow-worms; hunt for rare orchids around Kenfig National Nature Reserve; and comb Southerndown Beach for fossils and the elusive chough The common blue butterfly at Southerndown
On NNRs up and down the country, spring sees the return of migratory waders such as golden plover and curlew, while whinchat and ring ouzel start to appear on our upland heaths and moors.
As a result, boating should be good on the Owyhee River this year, according to Brian Sykes of Ouzel Outfitters in Bend, who closely monitors water forecasts by various government agencies.