ovarian insufficiency

ovarian insufficiency

[ō′ver·ē·ən ‚in·sə′fish·ən·sē]
(medicine)
Deficient functioning of the ovaries, leading to amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, or abnormal dysfunctional uterine bleeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cell therapy is being tested on patients with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), which sends one in 100 women into menopause before the age of 40.
Premutation carriers with repetition of CGG triplets between 55 and 200, are at high risk to develop Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS) or Fragile X-associated Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (FXPOI) (8, 9, 10).
Possible causes of amenorrhea include pregnancy, polycystic ovary syndrome, thyroid abnormalities, hyperprolactinemia, primary ovarian insufficiency, or hypogonadal amenorrhea, typically stimulated by the first instance of anorexia, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, or a gluten intolerance.
It's also FDA approved for women who had hypogonadism, primary ovarian insufficiency, or premature surgical menopause, who may use HT until the average age of menopause--about 52 years.
9 Furthermore, as serum AMH deranges earlier than FSH, efforts are being made to use it as a diagnostic marker of acute ovarian insufficiency due to cancer treatment.
Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) previously known as premature menopause or premature ovarian failure (POF) is surprisingly not a rare occurrence (1).
Fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) is characterized by decreased ovarian function, which can lead to infertility and early menopause in some female carriers of the FMR1 gene.
SUMMARY--Primary premature ovarian insufficiency (PPOI) is characterized by hypergonadotropic amenorrhea and hypoestrogenism in women under 40 years of age.
This is known as early-onset menopause or premature ovarian insufficiency.
The term primary ovarian insufficiency has been suggested [1,2] noting that this term was first used by the prominent endocrinologist Fuller Albright as early as 1942.
Based on these results, we diagnosed primary ovarian insufficiency (POI).
They also cover pathology, including omics for oocyte selection, alterations in gene expression, transgenerational risks by exposure in utero, obesity and oocyte quality, the safety of ovarian stimulation, epigenetics, and the genetic basis for primary ovarian insufficiency, and technology and clinical medicine, with discussion of polar body screening for aneuploidy and transplantation of ovarian tissue or immature oocytes to preserve and restore fertility.