pack


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pack

1. a complete set of similar things, esp a set of 52 playing cards
2. a group of animals of the same kind, esp hunting animals
3. Rugby the forwards of a team or both teams collectively, as in a scrum or in rucking
4. a small package, carton, or container, used to retail commodities, esp foodstuffs, cigarettes, etc.
5. short for pack ice
6. Med
a. a sheet or blanket, either damp or dry, for wrapping about the body, esp for its soothing effect
b. a material such as cotton or gauze for temporarily filling a bodily cavity, esp to control bleeding
7. a parachute folded and ready for use
8. Computing another name for deck

pack

[pak]
(computer science)
To reduce the amount of storage required to hold information by changing the method of encoding the data.
(industrial engineering)
To provide protection for an article or group of articles against physical damage during shipment; packing is accomplished by placing articles in a shipping container, and blocking, bracing, and cushioning them when necessary, or by strapping the articles or containers on a pallet or skid.
(mining engineering)
A pillar built in the waste area or roadside within a mine to support the mine roof; constructed from loose stones and dirt.
Waste rock or timber used to support the roof or underground workings or used to fill excavations. Also known as fill.
(oceanography)
(ordnance)
Part of a parachute assembly in which the canopy and shroud lines are folded and carried. Also known as pack assembly.

pack

(1) To compress data in order to save space. Unpack refers to decompressing data. See data compression.

(2) An instruction that converts a decimal number into a packed decimal format. Unpack converts a packed decimal number into decimal.

(3) In database programs, a command that removes records that have been marked for deletion.
References in classic literature ?
Then there was a sudden and awful glare of light all about us, and in that very instant every one of the millions of seats was occupied, and as far as you could see, in both directions, was just a solid pack of people, and the place was all splendidly lit up
Tom, I reckon you've got to pack up and go down to Arkansaw--your aunt Sally wants you.
It is strange he hasn't married, with all his money, and him so fond of children that he always has a pack of them at his heels.
Elton was to take the drawing to London, chuse the frame, and give the directions; and Emma thought she could so pack it as to ensure its safety without much incommoding him, while he seemed mostly fearful of not being incommoded enough.
The fiend pinning down the thief's pack behind him, I passed over quickly: it was an object of terror.
I bowed and returned the pledge; beginning to perceive that it would be foolish to sit sulking for the misbehaviour of a pack of curs; besides, I felt loth to yield the fellow further amusement at my expense; since his humour took that turn.
As I once more shouldered my pack and went my way, the character of the country side began to change, and, from a semi- pastoral heathiness and furziness, took on a wildness of aspect, which if indeed melodramatic was melodrama carried to the point of genius.
The Law of the Jungle, which never orders anything without a reason, forbids every beast to eat Man except when he is killing to show his children how to kill, and then he must hunt outside the hunting grounds of his pack or tribe.
His baggage was arranged in packs, three to a mule, or pack-horse; one being disposed on each side of the animal and one on the top; the three forming a load of from one hundred and eighty to two hundred and twenty pounds.
As the creeper that girdles the tree-trunk the Law runneth forward and back-- For the strength of the Pack is the Wolf, and the strength of the Wolf is the Pack.
At the appointed time our business committee reported, and said all things were in readdress--that we were to start to-day, with horses, pack animals, and tents, and go to Baalbec, Damascus, the Sea of Tiberias, and thence southward by the way of the scene of Jacob's Dream and other notable Bible localities to Jerusalem--from thence probably to the Dead Sea, but possibly not--and then strike for the ocean and rejoin the ship three or four weeks hence at Joppa; terms, five dollars a day apiece, in gold, and every thing to be furnished by the dragoman.
The next day, which was Friday, we got them all together, and met in the evening to pack.