assessment

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assessment

An informal examination by experts of systems, programming, operations and security to improve efficiency and effectiveness using industry best practices. See audit and continuous process improvement.

assessment

A tax, charge, or levy on property:
1. as a means of computing real estate tax;
2. to pay for specific services or improvements.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the nurses' perspective, patient communication was reported to be a significant barrier to pain assessment (Herr et al 2004).
sup][3],[4] In recent years, a series of studies have found that electroencephalogram (EEG) as a noninvasive, safe, and reliable means of examination, can be used in the field of pain assessment.
New NHS guidelines say that anyone put forward for pain assessment goes to Longfields Court in Barnsley.
This has led some to suggest that pain assessment should be considered the fifth vital sign.
Now it is used around the world with people ages 3 years and older, improving pain assessment to achieve proper pain management (Jacob, 2007).
Since none of those conditions precludes the perception of pain, it is essential that clinicians have valid and reliable pain assessment methods," Dr.
Keywords: acquired brain injury, disorders of consciousness, nociception, pain, pain assessment
In addition to reviewing these strategies, the statement recommended all providers implement and use pain assessment and management plans that include both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies for major procedures and routine minor interventions that might still cause pain.
Moreover, although proposals for systematic implementation research of regular pain assessment protocols have been put forward, empirical evaluations of feasibility have been extremely limited [21].
provided a good example of the difficulties of pain assessment in patients with cognitive impairment and their possible solution.
Unfortunately, the pain assessment tools used by the physicians were not documented in the case files of these patients.
For decades, it has been thought that the ability to verbalize pain presence is important, given that self-report is considered the gold standard of pain assessment (McCaffrey, 1968).