paradigm

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paradigm

(in the philosophy of science) a very general conception of the nature of scientific endeavour within which a given enquiry is undertaken

paradigm

  1. any example or representative instance of a concept or a theoretical approach, e.g. MERTON's (1949) summary exemplifying discussion of the strengths and pitfalls of functional analysis in sociology. In some branches of philosophy a ‘paradigm case’ is seen as providing an ‘ostensive definition’ of a concept.
  2. see SCIENTIFIC PARADIGM.

Paradigm

 

a system of the various inflectional forms of a word. A paradigm shows the way a word’s appearance is modified according to the grammatical categories inherent in a word. A noun, for example, has inflectional forms for gender, number, and case, and a verb for person, tense, and aspect. A paradigm is a pattern of change in a word, based on grammatical categories. It is an example of a declension or conjugation.

Since a paradigm is characterized by lexical identicalness of a stem, it is frequently represented as a table of endings that are to serve as a model for the inflection of a given part of speech or for the derivation of word forms (formoobrazovanie). A description of a paradigm takes into account the number of members in the set (a paradigm is a closed series of forms), the order in which the members are arranged, the endings of each member of the paradigm, and the possible morphophonemic transformations of the stem and/or endings. Any restricted system of secondary formations with a single base is often called a paradigm; such a paradigm may be morphological, lexical, derivational, or some other type. Linguists usually use the concept of syntactic paradigm to designate a system of forms of a sentence, as in syn uchitsia (“the son is studying”), syn uchilsia (“the son studied”), and so forth.

Paradigms may be either partial (or minor), consisting of groups of forms with a certain organization, or complete (major), comprising a complement of partial paradigms. In Russian, for example, the complete paradigm of adjectives includes three singular paradigms, one plural paradigm, one paradigm of short forms, and the forms for the degrees of comparison.

E. S. KUBRIAKOVA

paradigm

Pronounced "pah-ruh-dime." A model, example or pattern. See paradigm shift and metaphor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Technology, we have proposed, increasingly imposes the paradigmatic, thus diminishing dialogue.
What led Jakobson to postulate a similarity relationship among paradigmatic units?
The Jews were seen as the storehouse of knowledge of the bible necessary for Muslim understanding of the Qur'an, while the Muslim paradigmatic reading of history was implemented with an eye to the relationship between Muhammad and the Jews of Medina, as well as the (negative) timeless scriptural presentation of the Jews.
I guess I am what most call a "snowbird," enjoying the mild winter and scramming during the oppressive summer, But in those months of fall, winter, and spring, Phoenix is one of the best places to skate, regardless of whether you buy into the paradigmatic approach, but especially good if you do not, or whether you care about packs of rolling Barneys on the Arizona State University campus and elsewhere.
It is here that initial research and theory building takes place as well as the critical process of replication that prepares the way for paradigmatic changes.
But they tend to speak from a point of view, whether it is conservative, liberal, or something in between; and the greater the force of their ideas, the more they resist being ground down to the bland, paradigmatic porridge that Friedan hopes to concoct.
Later, these stories of liberation from slavery, a covenant with Yahweh and bestowal of the law became the paradigmatic tales that united the migrants with other tribes already present in the land of Canaan, inspired their cult and justified their conquest.
From this paradigmatic and cyberspeak vocabulary, Pinkerton's narrative turns in a more conventional direction, explaining the decisive turning points in American politics--what the political scientists call "realignments"--as "Big Offers.
These methodological and paradigmatic commitments do not consider the political economic context.
And that string of words is a paradigmatic run-on sentence, or comma splice.
In its pages Young Back Choi develops twenty-four propositions and twenty-four corollaries which stem from the paradigmatic approach to uncertainty and decision making.
Set in approximately 1870--the period of Jose Hernandez's paradigmatic gaucho epic, Martin Fierro (1872, 1879)--it recounts the massacre of individuals accused of outlawry by military forces, as part of the protracted campaign to bring the countryside under central government control.