parenteral

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parenteral

[pər′ent·ə·rəl]
(medicine)
Outside the intestine; not via the alimentary tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a subset of patients with hardware-associated osteomyelitis or infections of implanted cardiac devices, we performed a matched case-control analysis to examine length of parenteral therapy in C.
It has already been recommended by previous studies in Croatia and neighboring countries, as well as by NICE recommendations as first line parenteral therapy (2-5,7,10,14,22,23,25,31).
When calves of group B (n=10) were treated with parenteral therapy of Moxin and Melacam the average percentage recovery was 43.
Three of those deaths were due to uncontrolled SA infection (2 of those 3 had received less than 4 weeks of parenteral therapy for their infection), whereas the other 4 deaths were secondary to progression of underlying diseases (all had received more than 4 weeks of parenteral therapy).
For class 2, 28% patients were treated with parenteral therapy, with 40% receiving both oral and parenteral therapy and 32% patients receiving only oral therapy.
Either oral or parenteral therapy can be used, with the choice based on clinical judgment--taking into account severity of illness, ability to take oral medication, and reliability of follow-up.
She responded well to surgical drainage and mastoidectomy with myfingotomy tube placement and initial parenteral therapy with vancomycin (plus ceftriaxone), and was transitioned to oral levofloxacin.
The authors believe clinicians should suggest at the initial educational encounters that all patients (even those beginning on oral regimens) experience a saline injection with an insulin syringe to alleviate fears about parenteral therapy (see TABLE for guide to administering insulin).
If one accepts that topical therapy is preferred to parenteral therapy for otorrhea, quinolone drops are preferred to other topical antibiotics because their dosing schedule calls for less frequent administration.
After another 6-week course of parenteral therapy, antimicrobial therapy was discontinued, and the patient was discharged (CRP 7 mg/L, ESR 35 mm/h); he was readmitted after 6 days with chills and high fever.
For example, a patient who is having parenteral therapy initiated should be assessed for adjustment to the new therapy as well as its effects on nutritional status.