past

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past

[′past]
(relativity)
For an event in space-time, all events from which a signal could be emitted that could reach the event in question by traveling at speeds less than or equal to the speed of light.
References in periodicals archive ?
Presentation of the passato prossimo cannot be postponed to the second year because adult learners understand the concept of pastness and are eager to talk about their own experiences in the past.
Thus, historical events are characterized by definitive pastness.
This "power of the past" does not, however, derive from pastness in itself.
When the woman who had owned this antique brushed her hair, she was preparing for the day; but the dead locks of the deceased, small tokens of the beloved tucked into the brush, did not encourage this woman to make the dead part of her present day as if they were alive again; rather, they preserved the past in its pastness, in its poignancy.
Thus, the model assumes a stage where children do not bother with a linguistically relevant distinction between pastness and futureness (nor about other features, such as the degree of remoteness from the here&now).
The pastness of the accounts of his narrators' various love affairs have a resounding impact, so much so that most of Higgins's mature fiction seems consumed with the problem of how to locate a form to accommodate the strangeness of a life that is frequently incomprehensible, forever on the point of departure, but always somehow anchored by bright moments of love, however brief.
He demands that one show perception "not only of the pastness of the past, but of its presence.
Most of all, it passes the time and so lifts the heavy weight of the pastness of the past.
The renewal of life rests not in a repristination of the pastness of the past, but rather in its novel "translation" as identity is mediated in difference, e.
history' promote an uncanny sense of familiar yet alien pastness.
We failed to respect "the pastness of the past," said our critics.
Instead of leaving Yiddish as a site of nostalgia and pastness, Katz made it current and thrust it into the center of contemporary postwar life.