pathetic fallacy


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pathetic fallacy

(in literature) the presentation of inanimate objects in nature as possessing human feelings
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The various aspects of Ruskin's thought that comprise his realism have been ably and extensively treated in the existing scholarship; in particular, his turn from Romanticism in the explication of pathetic fallacy is well established.
The discussions of The Mill on the Floss and Middlemarch both mention Eliot's use of pathetic fallacy, female subjectivity, and the inextricable link between the women of the novels and the landscapes they inhabit.
A similar paradox shows up in Tennyson's use of the pathetic fallacy.
Now, after staging the breakdown of an anaphora of apparent pathetic fallacy, the poem can permit itself any figure, as though it refused to fetishize any one formal procedure for inviting the reader to enter its time machine.
Nonetheless, it's eerie how "Jersey Cedars" portends miseries of the natural world akin to those borne in war, as though Ammons, like Jeremiah, the "weeping prophet," has confirmed the pathetic fallacy as "the usual condition of prophetic inspiration.
It is pathetic fallacy you long for--the roses nothing but
In another photograph taken by an unidentified lensman, the GDR seems to experience pathetic fallacy -- when it acquired a yellow air.
In the end, one wonders if the Romantic cliche once denounced by theorists as pathetic fallacy ("la nature est un etat d'ame") should not be rehabilitated, mutatis mutandis, as an important component of a rising self-consciousness as European culture sails toward modernity.
Even if I wanted to a writer, knowing the difference between personification and pathetic fallacy won't help much.
There's not a great deal to see at the Maypole, though I expected some version of what the literary critics call the pathetic fallacy.
John Ruskin's objection to the pathetic fallacy was that it epitomized the falseness, hypocrisy, and bad faith in the modern relationship to nature, in which even the poets and artists, those sensitive flower children of the Gotterdammerung, were so alienated they could express their love and wonder only through kitsch and Disney caricature--and thus the merry daffodils rejoice, the angry seas rage, and the lonely wind sighs, humanized into triviality.
For example, the role of cities as pathetic fallacy for the artist is easy to discern.