Patriliny


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Patriliny

 

the tracing of descent, kinship relations, and inheritance through the paternal line. Patriliny is one of the characteristics of a patrilineal clan system. Historically, patriliny succeeds matriliny or sometimes a bilateral system, which can serve as a form of transition from matriliny to patriliny. Patriliny has been preserved to the present time.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This is particularly clear from the examples of the Southeast Asian regions other than the Minangkabau, and the Swahili coasts of Kenya and Tanzania just north of Mozambique, where matriliny was gradually replaced by patriliny or bilateral kinship.
8) Gestation is the means through which women and children develop a particular form of maternal and filial devotion, the tlnh cam of sentiment, care and sacrifice, as opposed to the piety or hieu for a father inculcated through the social structures of patriliny.
Moieties are broad superstructures and different types (patrilineal and matrilineal) can all be accommodated by a common territorial pattern based on patriliny, complementary filiation and birth.
How does patriliny work and shape people's social connections (p.
Here, as elsewhere, the barbarian slave concubine, with her repeated reminders of proper wifely etiquette and her demonstrated loyalty to the patriliny, becomes a foil whose presence highlights the inappropriate and destructive behaviour of the unfaithful wife and demands pity and sympathy for her plight from the audience onstage, the chorus, and off.
Patriliny is a social construction of a particular type of fatherhood and motherhood.
Patriliny and patrilocality are the key features of such a system.
61) In this kind of kinship system (graphed in Figure 2), where neither patriliny nor cognation nor primogeniture prevail, the bond between maternal uncle and uterine nephew eclipses the bond between father and son.
Pious bequests plummeted, giving way to the earthly concerns of patriliny throughout the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries.
The in-depth case study chapters, four out of the total six, focus on the way in which ten out of the original 28 women - three factory, three service sector, two white-collar, and two semi-professional workers - each negotiate a course through patriliny.
In their classic analysis of inheritance practices in County Clare, Arensberg and Kimball specifically warn that the great emphasis on patriliny militated against childless couples turning to the wife's kin for an heir, because to do so could never "keep the name on the house".
Jay explores the threefold relationship of patriliny, sacrifice, and male dominance in ancient Israel, particularly the Priestly and Yahwist accounts in Genesis, and in the Church after Vatican II.