patrilocal

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patrilocal

residence of a married couple with husband's kin. Often this specifically means with the husband's father, but not always, so the synonym virilocal is often used to distance it from PATRILINEAL DESCENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patrilocality and the enabling behavior of family members, whether acquiescence or participation in abuse, calls for education in the community and in the courts.
Moreover, this new evidence from the skeletons is consistent with other archaeological, genetic, anthropological and even linguistic evidence for Patrilocality in Neolithic Europe.
But, on an island with a long history of patrilocality and a strong patrilineal ideology, where and to whom have women belonged?
However, continued social-cultural barriers to population flow such as endogamy and patrilocality could have led to the observed current differential geographic frequencies between the J2a-M410 and J1-M267 haplogroups.
58-68; John Bryant, 'Patrilines, patrilocality and fertility decline in Viet Nam', Asia-Pacific Population Journal, 17, 2 (2002): 111-28.
Even where gender equality is constitutionally endorsed, sex-based differences in role allocation may be reflected in male-female wage gaps, patrilineage (where descent, and often resources, flow through males), patrilocality (requiring women to move near their husband's kin groups upon marriage), and traditional attitudes of society forbidding women to carry out certain activities (Coltrane, 1992; Emrich et al.
The combined practices of marrying outside the language group, a phenomenon known as linguistic exogamy, and patrilocality, whereby a woman moves to the village of her husband, result in communities composed of a core of men and children who are same-language speakers and differently-speaking in-marrying women.
As noted in the introduction, rules and practices of exogamous marriage, land tenure, patrilineal/matrilineal inheritance, access rights and patrilocality, as well as the periodic dispersal and congregation of local groups at King George Sound present many significant parallels to the Stanner model of Aboriginal hunter-gatherer cultural ecology.
Patriliny and patrilocality are the key features of such a system.
If we are to believe the example of Bahia(11) on the basis of thorough examination of abundant sources beginning in the eighteenth century, a full understanding of the manumitted family requires that we not rely exclusively on the Western concept of "family," for the African experience of most of the manumitted slaves had its roots in cultural domains where polygamy, fratrilinearity, patrilocality and very extended family ties formed the basic principles of social organization among the creoles and their descendants.
Similarly, an immigration system predicated on marriage creates vulnerability to abuse, amplifying the impact of patrilocality.
These tensions are complicated by the normative nature of patrilocality where sons stay within their parents' home even after marriage, while married women join their husbands in their inlaws household.