patrimonialism


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patrimonialism

any form of political domination or political authority based on ‘personal’ and bureaucratic power exerted by a royal household (WEBER, 1922). As such ‘patrimonialism’ is a relatively broad term, not referring to any particular type of political system. The crucial contrast between patrimonialism and other types of political power is that:
  1. this power is formally ‘arbitrary’; and
  2. its administration is under the direct control of the ruler; (this means it involves the employment of retainers or slaves, mercenaries and conscripts, who themselves possess no independent basis of power, i.e. are not members of traditional landed aristocracy).

The limitation of patrimonialism, according to Weber, is that it was inherently unstable, tending to be subject to political upheavals, which arose from the emergence of rival centres of power. Since historically patrimonial systems were usually replaced by further patrimonial systems, their existence is seen as a barrier to any sustained economic and social transformation. Compare ORIENTAL DESPOTISM. See also EISENSTADT.

References in periodicals archive ?
Another term for this phenomenon might be patrimonialism.
With few exceptions, patrimonialism infiltrated the ex-colonial administrative state and military rule replaced civilian control.
The German sociologist Max Weber, perhaps the first scholar to take notice of its occurrence more generally in pre-modern societies, attempted to describe and explain it by introducing the concept of patrimonialism.
1997 'Institutionalized patrimonialism in Korean business' in The economic organization of East Asian capitalism.
He emphasizes that Portuguese institutions are still often dominated by clientelism, elitism, and patrimonialism, and hence the continuities with the past may be as striking as the changes since 1974,
With his argument that taxes on trade required just as much bureaucratic administration as did taxes on land and his additional argument that war and taxation frequently led to patrimonialism instead of bureaucracy Ertman seeks no less than to confront aspects of the classic and recently classic works by Charles Tilly, Hendrik Spruyt, Brian Downing, Michael Mann, and many others.
In each of the three countries, patriarchal authoritative relations have prevailed for centuries at many levels and have thus served to bind psyche and microsociety to political systems characterized by patrimonialism, patronage, and personal rule.
The tendency in the literature on corruption in post-independence Africa has been to detach the two moments and to isolate and decontextualize the moment of redistribution through ahistorical analogies that describe it as the politics of patrimonialism or prebendalism and so on.
Clientelism and patrimonialism in rural areas coexisted with selective state corporatism in urban regions.
Indeed, one of the challenges posed to many democratic consolidations stems from local democratic development: in practice this means that, despite that political elites have been socialised into the newly democratic regime, the majority of the population still lives under non-democratic power structures that resemble patrimonialism (O'Donnell, 1993; Mamdani, 1996).
Just as subsistence ethics largely characterized the culture of the baan, patrimonialism was the prevalent economic and political culture of the muang.
Reyna, "The Traveling Model that Would Not Travel: Oil, Empire, and Patrimonialism in Contemporary Chad," Social Analysis 51, no.