pedigree

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pedigree

1. 
a. the line of descent of a purebred animal
b. (as modifier): a pedigree bull
2. a document recording this

pedigree

[′ped·ə‚grē]
(genetics)
Diagrammatic representation of the ancestry of an individual.
References in classic literature ?
That pedigree I will give thee now - in my own fashion and some hard words as well.
He knew he had rendered a service to Mahbub Ali, and not for one little minute did he believe the tale of the stallion's pedigree.
He had never passed the serai gate since his arrival two days ago, but had been ostentatious in sending telegrams to Bombay, where he banked some of his money; to Delhi, where a sub-partner of his own clan was selling horses to the agent of a Rajputana state; and to Umballa, where an Englishman was excitedly demanding the pedigree of a white stallion.
It must be the pedigree of that made-up horse-lie,' said he, 'the thing that I carry to Umballa.
The Grogzwig coffers ran low, though the Swillenhausen family had looked upon them as inexhaustible; and just when the baroness was on the point of making a thirteenth addition to the family pedigree, Von Koeldwethout discovered that he had no means of replenishing them.
What Michael did know was that Del Mar had no pedigree and was a scrub as compared with thoroughbreds such as Steward, Captain Kellar, and MISTER Haggin of Meringe.
I wish,' returned, she, with a short laugh, 'that all the attractive points and desirable qualifications of the two gentlemen were united in one - that Lord Lowborough had Huntingdon's handsome face and good temper, and all his wit, and mirth and charm, or else that Huntingdon had Lowborough's pedigree, and title, and delightful old family seat, and I had him; and you might have the other and welcome.
I was born a yellow pup; date, locality, pedigree and weight unknown.
I have in my possession a paper, yellow with age, that was sent soon after the novel appeared, containing "The Pedigree of the Family of Appine," wherein it is said that "Alan 3rd Baron of Appine was not killed at Flowdoun, tho there, but lived to a great old age.
In the time of the Romans, as we hear from Pliny, immense prices were given for pigeons; 'nay, they are come to this pass, that they can reckon up their pedigree and race.
Genetic variability of populations and similarity of subpopulations in Austrian cattle breeds determined by analysis of pedigrees.
Pedigrees were found to be notably more amiable, and the friendliest of all was the hairless sphynx cat, which was even happy to visit the vet and be bathed.