peer


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peer

1. a member of a nobility; nobleman
2. a person who holds any of the five grades of the British nobility: duke, marquess, earl, viscount, and baron

Peer

 

the title of a representative of the higher nobility in Great Britain and France. The title first appeared in the Middle Ages. In France it was eliminated in 1789 but temporarily revived during the period from 1814 to 1848. In Great Britain the peerage still exists. Peers have the right to membership in the House of Lords.

peer

[pir]
(communications)
A functional unit in a communications system that is in the same protocol layer as another such unit.

peer

(networking)
A unit of communications hardware or software that is on the same protocol layer of a network as another. A common way of viewing a communications link is as two protocol stacks, which are actually connected only at the very lowest (physical) layer, but can be regarded as being connected at each higher layer by virtue of the services provided by the lower layers. Peer-to-peer communication refers to these real or virtual connections between corresponding systems in each layer.

To give a simple example, when two people talk to each other, the lowest layer is the physical layer which concerns the sound pressure waves travelling from mouth to ear (so mouths and ears are peers) the next layer might be the speech and hearing centres in the people's brains and the top layer their cerebellums or minds. Although, barring telepathy, nothing passes directly between the two minds, there is a peer-to-peer communication between them.

peer

On the same level or providing the same function. In networking, a peer is a node that provides the same functionality as another. For example, two desktop PCs in a network are peers. A desktop PC and a server are not peers as they perform different operations. The desktop PC may query the server for business data, but the server does not query the PC for the same data. See peering.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, peer relationships are important for individuals with disabilities in educational and employment settings.
4) By listening, peer supporters provide an opportunity for officers under stress to express their frustrations, fears, and other emotions to another person who understands from personal experience how they are feeling and why they are upset.
Probably the same percentages apply to the number of peer opinion leaders in the population.
Peer review documents, marked as such, should be distributed on a "need to know" basis to hospital personnel qualified to use them to improve patient care.
Companies confirm that peer review keeps disputes out of the courtroom.
The board believes that California consumers would be disserved if small firms and sole practitioners were exempted from mandatory peer review as provided by current state statute.
FIRMS WILL NOTICE SIGNIFICANT CHANGES in their peer review reports and letters of comments.
Study authors often complain about the secretive nature of traditional peer review, Miller notes.
Classwide peer tutoring and the prevention of school failure.
Transparency of peer review results also is consistent with the profession's hallmark of competence.
There are many companies that provide load balancing services, and there are many others that have data centers in multiple locations, but Peer 1 is exceptional as GLOBAL has been developed to work specifically with the Peer 1 network.