peptic ulcer


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peptic ulcer:

see ulcerulcer,
open sore or circumscribed erosion, usually slow to heal, on the skin or mucous membranes. It may develop as a result of injury; because of a circulatory disturbance, e.g.
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peptic ulcer

[′pep·tik ′əl·sər]
(medicine)
An ulcer involving the mucosa, submucosa, and muscular layer on the lower esophagus, stomach, or duodenum, due in part at least to the action of acid-pepsin gastric juice.

peptic ulcer

Pathol an ulcer of the mucous membrane lining those parts of the alimentary tract exposed to digestive juices. It can occur in the oesophagus, the stomach, the duodenum, the jejunum, or in parts of the ileum
References in periodicals archive ?
The analysts forecast the Global Peptic Ulcer Drugs market to grow at a CAGR of 2.
Patients with suspected acute peptic ulcer bleeding were admitted to hospital and resuscitated, and underwent emergency gastroscopy within 24 hours of admission.
The findings are noteworthy because patients are sometimes switched from aspirin to clopidogrel (Plavix) as an alternative treatment for aspirin-related peptic ulcers.
In addition, alcohol problems in the family and fear of some member of the family were also more common among peptic ulcer patients than among other respondents.
Many mtDNA sequence variants were identified in the peptic ulcer tissues and corresponding blood cells.
Current status of indications for surgery in peptic ulcer disease.
Sometimes peptic ulcers bleed, which can lead to a loss of iron, causing anaemia, making the person look pale and feel tired.
To (1) provide information on the temporal association between fatal peptic ulcer presenting as sudden death and NSAID use prior to death, and (2) to examine the diagnostic efficiency of postmortem determination of NSAID levels using high-pressure liquid chromatography.
Barry Marshall, the maverick Australian doctor who, during the early 1980s, swallowed a large dose of what he believed were ulcer-causing bacteria and eventually developed stomach inflammation, we now know that the bacterium Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers.
Until now, the traditional treatment for peptic ulcer disease involved minimizing and suppressing acid secretion with drugs called H-2 blockers, which interfere with the release of histamine and thus reduce acid production in the stomach.
The concurrent use of H-2 blockers such as Tagamet, Zantac, Pepcid or Axid, may help to prevent the gastritis seen with NSAIDs, but they do not prevent NSAID-induced peptic ulcer disease.