pergelic

pergelic

[pər′jel·ik]
(geology)
Referring to a soil temperature regime in which the mean annual temperature is less than 0°C and there is permafrost.
References in periodicals archive ?
2002), sometimes referred to as the Norton Sound Highlands, are classified as Pergelic Cryaquepts to Pergelic Cryorthents (Rieger et al.
Although the soils sampled in the Seward Peninsula (mostly Pergelic Cryaquepts to Pergelic Cryorthents, Rieger et al.
The soils were originally classified as Sandy or Loamy Mixed Lithic or Pergelic Haplocryods (Beyer et al.
Soils of the subgroup Pergelic Cryopsamments are associated with the open and stable dune communities.
total sample set <5 -10 -20 (mg TOC/g fine earth) Lithic Cryorthents 203 19 4 33 36 Lithic and Pergelic Haplocryods 99 22 7 17 29 Lithic and Pergelic Cryaquepts 42 9 28 42 19 Soil unit(A) Percentage of total sample set -30 -50 -100 -150 (mg TOC/g fine earth) Lithic Cryorthents 13 8 4 1 Lithic and Pergelic Haplocryods 26 15 5 0 Lithic and Pergelic Cryaquepts 7 2 2 0
The accumulation of organic matter in the topsoil induces the formation of A-C soils: Lithic or Pergelic Cryorthents (Blume et al.
This is why all Pergelic Cryaquepts are Aquaturbels (Tables 6 and 8).
According to the recent Keys to Soil Taxonomy (Soil Survey Staff 1996), only Lithic and Pergelic soil units can be distinguished.
Site B was characterised by a huge solifluction tongue from loamy fine material with loamy, Pergelic Cryaquepts showing scattered vegetation (Table 10) due to an active cryoturbation (Washburn 1980).
Soil unit(A) Vegetation(B) Sandy-skeletal, Lithic Haplocryod(c) Mosses and lichens--100% Loamy-skeletal, Pergelic Haplocryod Nil Loamy-skeletal, Lithic and Pergelic Cryaquept Scattered mosses, lichens, algae Fine-loamy, Lithic Cryaquept Mosses--100% Sandy-skeletal, Lithic Cryorthent Mosses and lichens--100% Loamy-skeletal, Lithic Cryorthent: With initial Podzol features Mosses and lichens--100% With no initial Podzol features Mosses and lichens--030%
However, the loamy Pergelic Haplocryods on relic penguin rookeries showed no vegetation at all, because of the thick gravel pavement, which requires a very long time to be colonised by plants (Smith 1990).
In a Pergelic Cryohemist (Terri-Gelic Histosol) from mosses, the depth distribution of C forms suggested a decomposition of carbohydrates and the enrichment of alkyl C in the deeper horizons (Fig.