ligament

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ligament

(lĭg`əmənt), strong band of white fibrous connective tissueconnective tissue,
supportive tissue widely distributed in the body, characterized by large amounts of intercellular substance and relatively few cells. The intercellular material, or matrix, is produced by the cells and gives the tissue its particular character.
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 that joins bones to other bones or to cartilage in the joint areas. The bundles of collagenous fibers that form ligaments tend to be pliable but not elastic. They therefore permit freedom of movement within a certain limited range while holding the attached bones firmly in place. For example, the ligaments at the knee limit the movement of the lower leg to a certain range. Other types of ligaments form fibrous sheets that support such internal organs as the kidneys and the spleen.

Ligament

A strong, flexible connective tissue band usually found between two bony prominences. Most ligaments are composed of dense fibrous tissue formed by parallel bundles of collagen fibers. They have a shining white appearance and are pliable, strong, and noncompliant. A second kind of ligament, composed either partly or almost entirely of yellow elastic fibers, is extensible or compliant, thereby allowing the connected bones to move apart. See Connective tissue, Joint (anatomy)

Ligament

 

in man, a dense band or layer of fibrous tissue that connects skeletal bones or individual organs. Ligaments usually are found near joints and perform a variety of functions, depending on the movements in the joint. Joint capsules are strengthened by reinforcing ligaments, limited in their amplitude by inhibiting ligaments, and directed in their movements by directing ligaments. In many joints, ligaments act as passive bands whose attenuation impairs static functions and alters the shape of the corresponding elements of the skeleton. The main blood vessels that nourish bone pass through some ligaments. The microscopic structure of articular ligaments consists of a variety of dense fibrous tissue whose dominant elements are bands of collagenous and elastic fibers.

The term “ligament” is often applied to anatomic formations not associated with joints, for example, the ligaments of visceral organs, which consist of fine double layers of peritoneum.

ligament

[′lig·ə·mənt]
(engineering)
The section of solid material in a tube sheet or shell between adjacent holes.
(histology)
A flexible, dense white fibrous connective tissue joining, and sometimes encapsulating, the articular surfaces of bones.

ligament

Anatomy any one of the bands or sheets of tough fibrous connective tissue that restrict movement in joints, connect various bones or cartilages, support muscles, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The activity of dental sac cells leads to the formation of the periodontal ligament and cementum [32].
sup][15] reported that an increase in the number of bone walls generally correlated with a significant increase in periodontal ligament and cementum and a decrease in formation of JE in self-healing condition after OFD.
Platelet-rich plasma-derived fibrin clot formation stimulates collagen synthesis in periodontal ligament and osteoblast cells in vitro.
cells) from periodontal ligament (PDL) of permanent teeth were obtained and characterized in a previous study.
Wang, "Low-power laser irradiation promotes the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells via cyclic adenosine monophosphate," International Journal ofOral Science, vol.
Presence of viable periodontal ligament cells is the most important factor in determining the final prognosis of an avulsed tooth.
Effect of low-level GaAlAs laser irradiation on he proliferation rate of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts: an in vitro study.
Increased levels of activated MMPs gradually destroys the collagenous matrix, degrade the gingiva, the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone in the infected periodontium.
Eventually periodontal ligament damage and tooth loss can occur.
The disease subsequently destroys periodontal structures including cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone.
Five major sources of stem cells have been proposed: dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs); stem cells from human exfoliated teeth (SHEDs); periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs); stem cells from the apical root papilla (SCAPs); dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) (Table 2, Figure 2).
Effet of storage in media with different ion strength and osmolalities on human periodontal ligament cells.