petrologist


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Related to petrologist: petrological

petrologist

[pə′träl·ə·jəst]
(geology)
An individual who studies petrology.
References in periodicals archive ?
There followed an intense period of research in which literally dozens of mineralogists, geologists and petrologists brought their talents to bear on the Volyn pegmatites, but the two most important summaries in modern times are Mineralizing fluids and mineral assemblages of the chamber-type pegmatites of the Ukraine (Kalyuzhnyi et al.
Methods typically employed by igneous petrologists and gemologists to identify glass include the observance of conchoidal fracture, determination of hardness, reaction to a hotpoint, microscopy, and spectroscopy (Gemological Institute of America [GIA] 1996; GIA 1998; Hatch et al.
Modern geologists and sedimentary petrologists wishing to study some parts of argillosphere in more detail should have in their research team a specialized crystallographer for the investigation of order-disorder states and polytypism of phyllosilicates.
Petrologists who initially studied spinifex texture noticed that the skeletal olivine phenocrysts in komatiites (Fig.
The book will be of interest to structural geologists, geochemists, petrologists, geophysicists, and geomorphologists.
This viewpoint remained widely held until the 1970s, and even lingers on today among some coal petrologists (Scott 1989).
It will be invaluable reading for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, as well as igneous petrologists, mineralogists and geochemists involved in the study of igneous rocks and processes.
Recognition of the ophiolitic rock clan in North America was late, due to conflicts among field geologists, experimental petrologists, and marine geologists.
Of interest to materials scientists, mineralogists, petrologists, geochemists, and geophysicists, the discussion includes an initial general description of the structure, chemistry, optical and physical properties, distinguishing features, and paragenesis of silica minerals.
No wonder that clay minerals, clay raw materials, many different argillaceous accumulations, and soils are intensively studied by mineralogists, petrologists, geologists, clay- and soil scientists, chemists, physicists and engineers of engaged technological branches.
I know others concur with my view, as out of curiosity I checked out other reviews by igneous petrologists and regional experts.
This is important because petrologists and geochemists have long debated the depth to which melting extends.