petty

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Related to pettily: staunchly

petty

Law of lesser importance

Petty

girl airbrushed beauty, scantily clad in Esquire’s pages. [Am. Lit.: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, Obama should forbid the US government from acting pettily toward the released cables or trying to punish members of the public who read and use them.
Its effect is far from spiritually uplifting for it is followed by the pettily vindictive reaction of the "Borges" character, who emerges unchanged, denying having had the experience.
2009; PettilY, 2009), as follows from the correspondence between Leibniz and L'Hospital in 1695, its great consequences in contemporary theoretical research and real world applications have been widely discussed relatively recently.
At the time it seemed a pettily pathetic effort at propagating publicity.
It would cost little or nothing for these cards to run to the end of their original validity and the Government is being pettily vindictive in not allowing this.
He is furious, tells her to have an abortion and, rather pettily, burns the baby scan photo.
When we fight pettily among ourselves, our religion can come to feel petty.
Relationships for the Intimately Challenged: Connecting with Family, Friends, and Co-Workers to Create a More Joyful Life" is a guide to help all readers make the most of their relationships instead of pettily fighting over the problems that come up through the course of life--to celebrate the joy that is there to begin with to make relationships tighter and more fulfilling overall.
Letice's mask slips when she accuses Granny of trying to "undermine her authority" (123) and pettily puts a nasty sign on Granny's jar of homemade jam (128).
36) This list of pettily unattractive character flaws could extended almost indefinitely, making it all the more striking that the comparatively few moments in which Zeluco approaches a form of Gothic grandeur in his wrongdoing swamps them so completely in the final impression left on readers.
In her ignorant folly she is like Lydia but rather more cynical: she wants to drive a hard bargain (though, pettily, it comes down to the "pinmoney" [64]).
Must the two biggest clubs in England act so pettily, so disgracefully, when they play one another?