fantasy

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fantasy

, phantasy
1. Psychol
a. a series of pleasing mental images, usually serving to fulfil a need not gratified in reality
b. the activity of forming such images
2. Music another word for fantasia fancy, development
3. 
a. literature having a large fantasy content
b. a prose or dramatic composition of this type

fantasy

[′fan·tə·sē]
(psychology)
An imagined image or series of images that serves to express unconscious conflicts, to gratify unconscious wishes, or to prepare for anticipated future events.

Fantasy

See also Enchantment.
Aladdin’s lamp
when rubbed, genie appears to do possessor’s bidding. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights, “Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp”]
Alice
undergoes fantastic adventures, such as dealing with the “real” Queen of Hearts. [Br. Lit.: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland; Through the Looking Glass]
Alnaschar
dreams of the wealth he will realize from the sale of his glassware. [Arab. Lit.: Benét, 26]
Arabian Nights
compilation of Middle and Far Eastern tales. [Arab. Lit.: Parrinder, 26]
Back to Methuselah
England in the late twenty-second century is a bureaucracy administered by Chinese men and African women. [Br. Drama: Shaw Back to Methuselah in Magill III, 82]
Baggins, Bilbo Hobbit
who wanders afar and brings back the One Ring of Power to The Shire. [Br. Lit.: The Hobbit]
Bloom, Leopold
enlivens his uneventful life with amorous daydreams. [Irish Lit.: Joyce Ulysses in Magill I, 1040]
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
magical car helps track down criminals. [Children’s Lit.: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang]
Dorothy
flies via tornado to Oz. [Am. Lit.: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz]
Dream Children
in a reverie, Charles Lamb tells stories to his two imaginary children. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 287]
Fantasia
music comes to life in animated cartoon. [Am. Cinema: Fantasia in Disney Films, 38–45]
Harvey
six-foot rabbit who appears only to a genial drunkard. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 444]
Jurgen
regaining his lost youth, he has strange “adventures with a host of mythical persons. [Am. Lit.: Jurgen in Magill I, 464]
Land
of the Giants a Gulliver’s Travels in outer space. [TV: Terrace, II, 10–11]
Little Prince, The
travels to Earth from his star; fable by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1943). [Fr. Lit.: Benét, 889]
Lord of the Rings, The
“feigned history” of the Hobbits; epic trilogy written by J. R. R. Tolkein. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 1013]
Millionaire, The
mysterious Croesus bestows fortunes on unsuspecting individuals. [TV: Terrace, II, 97–98]
Mitty, Walter
timid man who imagines himself a hero. [Am. Lit.: Benét, 1006; Am. Cinema and Drama: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty]
Narnia
kingdom in which fantasy cycle of seven tales by C. S. Lewis takes place. [Children’s Lit.: Fisher, 289–290]
O’Gill, Darby
befriends dwarfdom. [Am. Cinema: Darby O’Gill and the Little People in Disney Films, 159–162]
Pan, Peter
escapes to Never Never Land to avoid growing up. [Br. and Am. Drama: Benét, 778]
Poppins, Mary
enchanted nanny guides her charges through fey adventures. [Children’s Lit.: Mary Poppins; Am. Cinema: Mary Poppins in Disney Films, 226–232]
Thirteen Clocks, The
beautiful princess is won by a disguised prince who fulfills her guardian’s task with the aid of laughter that turns to jewels. [Am. Lit.: Thurber The Thirteen Clocks in Weiss, 462]
Wonderful Wizard of Oz, The
adventures in land “somewhere over the rainbow.” [Am. Lit.: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz]
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike Cassius Longinus, Ptolemy does not define recollection ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) in his texts, but he does define memory in conjunction with his definition of phantasia in On the Kriterion.
On some occasions, Augustine clearly distinguishes phantasia from phantasma; on others, he appears to use them interchangeably.
Some matters are not covered as thoroughly as one might wish, especially the relation between phantasia and thought.
For the Stoics (including Epictetus) it determines whether what appears to us to be the case is actually the case (a kataleptike phantasia is rather an "apprehensive representation," that is, that which apprehends or captures the true reality of the thing).
Cum enim de re extra nihil recipit nisi speciem sensibilem in colore et similia, et aliis sensibilibus propriis et communibus, primo in sensitivo particulari, secundo in phantasia, tertio in intellectu, per ipsam non cognoscit nisi sensibile, vel sub ratione universalis, vel sub ratione particularis"; Ghent, Summa 34.
Labarriere traces the debates between Stoics and Academics concerning animal faculties, especially phantasia.
Animals move themselves, according to Aristotle, in so far as they are appetitive; and appetite presupposes phantasia (usually translated as imagination), the presentation of appearance in the soul.
It is tempting to answer that what is perceived is some particular configuration of colors, shapes, and so on (the objects perceived in themselves), and that this is interpreted to be some particular thing, such as the son of Diares, either by an act of intellect (in the case of humans) or by an act of the quasiperceptual faculty of phantasia (in the case of nonrational animals).
Second, I discuss the early modern use of phantasia, which includes the creative imagination of the writer.
Dall'indugio sulla phantasia alla stregoneria, il passo e breve: Matilde Capodivacca esamina la centralita di quest'ultimo tema nella produzione folenghiana, lo riscatta--distinguendo tra magia bianca e nera--da un'accezione assolutamente negativa e ne mostra l'affinita di marca immaginativa con la poesia macaronica, avallando, complici i riferimenti incrociati a Pietro Pomponazzi e a Giovanfrancesco Pico, la suggestiva equivalenza Strega=Musa (The Witch as Muse e non a caso il titolo del contributo).
Haywood stresses that, as narrative and the creation of alternative realities became ever more important, style in caricature tended to matter as much as subject: "somewhere near the heart of caricature's proliferating layers of intertextual and intervisual meaning is the self-reflexive 'signature' of the caricaturist, a visual imprint of the point at which history passes over into fantasy and phantasia through the transforming agency of the satirical imagination" (5).