photocopier


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photocopier

A machine that makes a duplicate of a paper document. Xerox invented the photocopy process in wide use today, which scans the sheet of paper to capture an image of its contents. However, machines in the early 1900s from the Rectigraph Company and the Photostat Corporation created an actual photograph of the document. See Xerox.
References in periodicals archive ?
2 million in fines because it failed to clear the hard drive of one of its leased photocopiers, which was later purchased by CBS.
There are various factors which drive the photocopiers market such as emerging technologies, increasing government organizations and other service industries, emerging desire for multifunctional devices, ease of use, and growing number of offices, fast digitalization of photocopying technologies and easier availability of such products at lesser prices.
The ECHO revealed how Lee Dickson - sole director of Pegasus Digital Solutions - had gone to ground after persuading Lydiate primary school to take out a pounds 30,000 five-year lease for two new photocopiers.
A council spokesman said: "The photocopier Mr Patel refers to was not purchased by the library service, and has come to the end of its life.
We can't operate without a photocopier and our previous machine was unreliable.
The sale of the UK photocopier business is part of our overall focus on improving shareholder value," says Jeff Brotman, TRM President and Chief Executive Officer.
We'd used the photocopier before for political things.
Endless meetings - the executive version of the photocopier gaggle.
During the recent "Road to Victory," Satan's name came up more than once; he was blamed for everything from broken photocopiers to bad public schools and news media bias.
With the help of a computer and photocopier (our monster photocopier will print on both sides, collate, and staple in just one operation), there is no reason to keep outdated handbooks on the shelf.
A digital X-ray machine that uses a nanocomposite would work something like a photocopier, Wang says.
The photocopier gave us the capability (though not without legal and administrative problems) of extending these benefits of portability and random access to materials which no publisher found it economic to bring out in paperback.