photoelectric photometer

photoelectric photometer

[¦fōd·ō·i′lek·trik fə′täm·əd·ər]
(engineering)
A photometer that uses a photocell, phototransistor, or phototube to measure the intensity of light. Also known as electronic photometer.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1964 astronomers Alan Binder and Dale Cruikshank reported that observations of Io with a photoelectric photometer revealed that the satellite brightens temporarily when it emerges from Jupiter's shadow following eclipses.
By 1952 a photoelectric photometer was mounted on the Astrographic, though plates continued to be taken and the twin photometric lenses were also in use.
8, 2000 the brightness and color of Saturn was measured with a photoelectric photometer and color filters.
A solid-state photoelectric photometer along with Johnson B, V, R and I filters were used.
The observatory closure is primarily due to the author's advancing age and the need to invest into new technologies, the photoelectric photometer has been mostly supplanted by CCD devices, an expense that the author can ill afford.
What it needs is an amateur-sized scope (or even a camera lens), a good DSLR or CCD camera or a photoelectric photometer, the right photometry software, and a diligent, thoughtful, persistent user.
About 20 years ago the standard photometric equipment for backyard observers was the photoelectric photometer.
While parts-per-thousand brightness measurements are challenging even to professional astronomers, "a serious amateur [with a photoelectric photometer or a CCD] should be able to make a measurement" of the newly discovered brightness dips, says David W.
My own adventures started in 1979, when I measured bright stars with a small telescope and homemade photoelectric photometer.
The photoelectric photometer I use is based on a simple design published by Robert Dick and others in the Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Vol.
Today, precise magnitudes are specified by what a standard photoelectric photometer sees through standard color filters, which are depicted above.
Using a 1-meter telescope equipped with a photoelectric photometer, students can view about 70 stars in the Pleiades and measure their magnitudes in the U, B, and V color system.

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