phrenic nerve


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Related to phrenic nerve: vagus nerve

phrenic nerve

[′fren·ik ¦nərv]
(neuroscience)
A nerve, arising from the third, fourth, and fifth cervical (cervical plexus) segments of the spinal cord; innervates the diaphragm.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are minimal data to show the effect of total diaphragmatic paralysis on ventilation caused by bilateral phrenic nerve block in humans.
This method is less invasive, reducing the risk of phrenic nerve damage, and can also be done outpatient making it less costly (50, 51).
5) In the past, hiccups after myocardial infarction have been successfully terminated by chlorpromazine, (8) cardioversion, (10) hypnosis, (9) or left phrenic nerve block or crush.
It might be possible therefore that sustained impulses from a central source along the phrenic nerve could cause skeletal spasm akin to cramp.
Bilateral intact phrenic nerves below the level of the spinal cord injury
com/research/t8phw5/the_world_market) has announced the addition of the "The World Market for Neurostimulation Devices (TENS, Carotid Sinus Nerve, Cochlear Implant, Deep Brain, Gastric Electrical, Phrenic Nerve, Sacral Nerve, Spinal Cord, Vagus Nerve, TMS, TNS and Other Stimulation Devices)" report to their offering.
The new quadripolar lead reduces the incidence of phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS), a potential side effect that results in muscle twitching, hiccups or shortness of breath.
Apnoea may result as a central (direct medullary centre depression) or peripheral (intercostal or phrenic nerve paralysis) effect.
Both the phrenic nerve and the branchial plexus were preserved.
Management is usually by positive pressure ventilation and, less often, by activation of the diaphragm muscle through phrenic nerve stimulation.
Phrenic nerve stimulation using magnetic or transcutaneous stimulation has previously been used to directly stimulate the diaphragm muscle (43) and may be useful in assessing whether force deficits indicative of muscle damage are present following an intense bout of ITL.
By scaling airway pressure to the integrated electrical signal flowing through the phrenic nerve to the diaphragm, NAVA has the potential to act effectively as an auxiliary muscle', the strength of which can be regulated unconsciously by the patient in proportion to innate need.