Picket

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Picket

 

(in Russian, avanpost), in some foreign armies and in 18th- and 19th-century Russia, a guard post, stationed in the enemy’s direction, in order to protect the troops, which were either at rest or in a defense position, from a surprise attack.


Picket

 

the name of a small detachment, outpost, or outguard used for security at the halt. Pickets were used in the French and certain other armies, including the Russian Army from the 19th century. They could include up to a platoon of infantry or cavalry and were sent out 2-4 km away from the troops in bivouac in the direction of the enemy. The pickets had pairs of sentries or advance posts in front of them.

pale

1. A flat strip (slat) or round stake, usually of wood; set in series to form a fence.
2. An area enclosed by such stakes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Picketers quickly established a routine in the 'cold rain, bitter winds' of wintry north-west Tasmania.
This left them standing directly beside the chanting picketers for several minutes at a time, though there was no direct interaction between the two groups.
Okay, so you managed to run the gauntlet of picketers at Psycho Donuts and snag yourself a couple of Bipolars on the way to work.
The most violent confrontation between police and picketers was at Orgreave coke plant in South Yorkshire on June 18, 1984.
Matches have even been made between picketers from different locations.
said his organization receives frequent visits from the picketers, but their presence doesn't discourage him.
Many Post-Gazette unionized employees joined the Blade picketers in a "great feeling of solidarity," she added.
Letters and a report dating from 1909 describe how suspicion grew regarding a group of female picketers outside the House of Commons.
Mitchell, the injunction limits the number of picketers to no more than six.
Four years before Stonewall, ,at Independence Hall on July 4, 1965, Gittings was among a group of pioneering gay and lesbian picketers who held the first Reminder Day, which according to Gittings was meant to "remind the public that there was still a sizable segment of the American people that were not benefiting from the promises in our founding fathers' document.
We are "the Silhouettes against the snow," as Grace Petrasek's book of 1991 called pro-life picketers.
Those non-existent picketers may be the least of it.