picture window


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picture window

a large window having a single pane of glass, usually placed so that it overlooks a view

picture window

A large fixed pane of glass, often between two narrower operable windows, usually located to present the most attractive view to the exterior. See also: French window

picture window

[′pik·chər ¦win·dō]
(building construction)
A large window framing an exterior view.

picture window

In a home or apartment, a large, fixed window, often between two narrower operable windows; usually located so as to present the most attractive view of the exterior.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The dining room, which has three floor-toceiling picture windows and a glass and oak framed door to the hall, and the guest cloakroom complete the accommodation on the ground floor.
For proof, read Picture Windows, Rosalyn Baxandall and Elizabeth Ewen's study of how the modern suburb emerged as a response to the affordable housing needs of working-class families after World War II.
Once we have good scans we run the files through Picture Window and blend the two or three files into one.
One thing that struck me about our glass wall and its hundred-dollar view (aside from the fact that the living room was always too hot and you never entered it unless fully dressed, even though the only creature apt to look in was a gull) was that the ocean was best appreciated from the couch, as if you were watching a movie screen, which the proportions of the picture window closely approximated.
SITTING PRETTY: The light living room has a classic feel while the bedrooms and landing with picture window, insets, are also nice and airy
A SPIRAL birch staircase, a Juliet balcony, curved picture windows - if this all sounds a bit too much for suburban Birmingham then take a look at 56 Serpentine Road, Harborne.
Patrons of the comfortable pub look through a large picture window at rows of growing lettuce.
But you're also likely to see the ones we want to zero in on, those small, one-and one-and-a-half-story homes with one dominant feature: a plain, oversized piece of glass called the picture window.
Acting on her idea, Portland architect Rosalind Reed Dwight first replaced a dated picture window with a pair of French doors flanked by fixed glass.
The house has a spacious entrance hall with cloakroom, leading to a sitting room with picture window, dining kitchen with integral appliances, family room/dining room with windows on three sides, lounge, conservatory and utility.
Two outstanding series from Picture Window Books provide young readers ages 5 to 9 with colorfully entertaining titles drawn from folklore.
Dining takes place in a large, airy room illuminated by a long slash of picture window glazing, while the cooking and serving end of things is kept well out of sight in the buried rear of the building.