pigment epithelium


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pigment epithelium

[‚pig·mənt ‚ep·ə′thē·lē·əm]
(histology)
A heavily pigmented layer of epithelial cells interposed between the photoreceptors of the vertebrate retina and their blood supply, the choroid. It forms a barrier regulating the exchange of fluids and substances between the blood and outer layer of the retina; it also plays a number of roles in support of photoreceptor structure and function in vertebrates.
References in periodicals archive ?
January 3, 2018 -- Scientists at the NIH's National Eye Institute (NEI) report that tiny tube-like protrusions called primary cilia on cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the back of the eye are essential for the survival of the retina's light-sensing photoreceptors.
Exudates are usually located in or adjacent to the outer plexiform layer because they are lipid residues that originate from damaged capillaries in the inner retina, whereas drusen are deposits between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane because the RPE is not functioning correctly.
OpRegen, being studied for the treatment of dry-AMD, is composed of differentiated retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells derived from human stem cells under xeno-free conditions.
These deposits, called drusen, are specifically found beneath a layer of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, which are known to be key players in macular degeneration.
Clinically, it is characterized by loss of transparency in the foveal region, intraretinal crystalline deposit accumulation, hyperplastic retinal pigment epithelium migration, macular pigment loss, and progressive abnormalities in the juxtafoveolar retinal vessels.
Our natural protection against damaging light of all wavelengths, primarily ultraviolet (UV) and blue, comes from a layer of pigmented cells called the retinal pigment epithelium.
The choroioretinal coloboma is a congenital lesion characterized by the absence of normal retina, retinal pigment epithelium and choroid1,2.
Multifocal serpiginoid choroiditis (MSC) is an uncommon clinical entity from the group of infectious choroiditis, which is characterized by sectoral nonperfusion of choriocapillaris with subsequent ischemia and dysfunction of retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor cells of the outer retina(1,2).
In detail, optic disc area was divided into four layers, which were optic nerve head (ONH) (all above retinal pigment epithelium layer), vitreous, radial peripapillary capillary (RPC) (between the nerve fibers), and choroid layers.
Areas of pigmentation of retinal pigment epithelium overlying tapetum were noticed in all seven pugs dogs especially near the tapetal- non tapetal junction.
Solicitation: Reagents for clinical-grade manufacturing of retinal pigment epithelium cells
Liu, looked at the effects of DHA on retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells.