pistillate


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Related to pistillate: staminate

pistillate

of plants
1. having pistils but no anthers
2. having or producing pistils

pistillate

[′pist·əl‚āt]
(botany)
Having a pistil.
Having pistils but no stamens.
References in periodicals archive ?
The staminate inflorescences are large, showy, loose, axillary, cymose panicles (thyrses), while the pistillate ones are small, obscure, congested, axillary, spicate cymes.
In monoecious forms, staminate flowers, if present (frequently on the upper part of flower-bearing stems) are produced before the pistillate flowers (frequently on the lower parts of stems); staminate flowers, if present, are also produced before transitional hermaphroditic flowers (some of which are sometimes sterile), which are also often encountered.
A female flower consists only of a gynoecium, which is subtended by a modified prophyll termed the utriculus or perigynium (Timonen, 1998) enveloping the pistillate flower, and often a rudimentary spikelet rachilla (Fig.
Cronquist (1981: 1139) reported "stamens most often three, sometimes only two or one, rarely six", but in the species studied by us, the number of stamens varies from zero (in pistillate flowers in Cariceae) to three (most species).
These sedges have long-sheathing proximal bracts, terminal spikes completely staminate, lateral spikes usually completely pistillate, tristigmatic pistillate flowers, and multi-nerved perigynia that are beakless or short-beaked.
Griseae: pistillate scales long-awned (#24), longest perigynium >4 mm long (#30), and dried perigynia with impressed nerves (#35).
All topologies suggest that the ancestral pistillate spikelet in Cariceae had three stigmas and that the loss of a stigma has occurred frequently during the evolution of the tribe.
Sepals that are connate at the base in pistillate flowers is another synapomorphy, albeit with exceptions, for the Moacroton clade + SAG (Fig.
One reason we believe Bernardia trelawniensis was assigned to Lasiocroton is because the original description only included pistillate specimens (Adams 1970).
The morphology of the flowers of the juglandaceae: The pistillate flowers and fruit.
6 mm long) and numerous (mean of 15,140 per pistillate cluster) (see Silander, 1979, for more details).