piston


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piston

a disc or cylindrical part that slides to and fro in a hollow cylinder. In an internal-combustion engine it is forced to move by the expanding gases in the cylinder head and is attached by a pivoted connecting rod to a crankshaft or flywheel, thus converting reciprocating motion into rotation

Piston

 

the moving component of a reciprocating engine that is fitted to the internal surface of a cylinder and moves back and forth along the direction of the cylinder’s axis. In engines, power cylinders, and presses, the piston transmits the pressure of a working fluid—gas, vapor, or liquid—to the moving parts. In some types of engines, such as two-cycle internal-combustion engines, the piston also plays a role in the gas distribution process. In pumps and compressors, the suction, compression, and delivery of the liquid or gas are accomplished by the reciprocating piston.

A piston may be of the trunk, disk, or plunger type, depending on the piston’s length-to-diameter ratio and on the piston’s design. The trunk piston, whose length is somewhat greater than its diameter, has a head, grooves for piston rings, and a guide skirt. The height of a disk piston is determined only by the size of the sealing device; the rod on which the piston is mounted serves to align the piston. The plunger piston, whether a plunger, ram, or pin, usually operates with a smooth surface; its length is several times greater than its diameter.

In rotary-piston internal-combustion engines, a rotor performs the functions of a piston in transmitting the pressure of a working fluid to the moving parts.

piston

[′pis·tən]
(electromagnetism)
A sliding metal cylinder used in waveguides and cavities for tuning purposes or for reflecting essentially all of the incident energy. Also known as plunger; waveguide plunger.
(engineering)
(mechanical engineering)
A sliding metal cylinder that reciprocates in a tubular housing, either moving against or moved by fluid pressure.

piston

piston
A sliding plug in an actuating cylinder that converts pressure into force and then into work. In reciprocating engines, a piston compresses the fuel-air mixture and transmits force from expanding gases in the cylinder to the crankshaft.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main part of piston that is forced is called piston crown.
Remember though, when you inspect the hydraulic deck pistons, some seepage is allowed, like it says in WP 0691 00 of TM 1-1520-23723-4.
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The interruption to production had forced all of the 12 Japanese automakers to suspend output due to the halt in the supply of piston rings.
Upon impact, the piston is driven to the rear so the brass body forms a 0.
The electron neutralizes one of four positive charges that hold the piston in place, weakening the bond enough to encourage the piston to slide all the way out.
Now turn the clutch clockwise with your wrench until the piston drops and the port is open.
The global automotive piston market to grow at a CAGR of 5.
Then the piston is mechanically moved into the barrel.
Excessive wear on the shoulder pins and piston rod on the recoil mechanism can also cause vibration.
Piston skirt friction, piston rings and bearings account for 66% of total friction losses and the valve train for 20 to 25% at low speed.
Under the deal, Nippon Piston Ring and ASIMCO Technologies China Ltd.