planter


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planter,

farm or garden implement that places propagating material such as seeds or seedlings into the ground, usually in rows. Broadcasting, i.e., scattering seed in all directions, by hand followed by harrowing (see harrowharrow,
farm implement, consisting of a wooden or metal framework bearing metal disks, teeth, or sharp projecting points, called tines, which is dragged over plowed land to pulverize the clods of earth and level the soil.
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) to cover the seed with soil was an early method of planting. Mechanical planters for small grains appeared in the United States around 1800; corn and cotton planters followed (1840–1880). Machines are currently available for almost every crop, including transplanting or plant-setting machines, which place live seedlings into the soil at spaced intervals, supply them with water and fertilizer, then close and pack the soil around them.

Bibliography

See H. P. Smith, Farm Machinery and Equipment (5th ed. 1964); C. Culpin, Farm Machinery (8th ed. 1969).

Planter

A permanent, ornamental container to receive planted pots or boxes, often nonmovable and integral with the finish of a building.

Planter

 

a machine for the uniform sowing of crop and grass seed by depositing the seeds in the soil at the required depth. Planters can also be used for sowing tree seeds in nurseries and for depositing mineral fertilizers in the soil.

Planters are classified according to the sowing method. Seed drills deposit seeds continuously using the row, narrow-row, wide-row, or band seeding method. Checkrow planters deposit clusters of seeds at the corners of squares or rectangles. Hill-drop planters distribute clusters of seeds in rows. Single-seed planters sow individual seeds at uniform intervals in wide rows. Broadcasters scatter fertilizers and seeds, such as grass seed for improving natural pastures, onto the surface of a field.

A distinction is made between general-purpose and special-purpose planters. General-purpose planters are used for sowing seeds of various crops; for instance, planters designed for grain seeds and grain-and-grass seeds can be used for sowing seeds for grain, bean, and olive crops, grass seed, and seed for bast crops. Special-purpose planters are designed for sowing seed for a single crop or a limited number of crops, for example, beet, cotton, corn, and vegetable crops. Planters may be combined with fertilizer attachments that deposit mineral fertilizers in the soil.

Planters are also classified according to the traction method used as tractor-driven (mounted or trailer-type), horse-drawn, or manually propelled. Only tractor-driven planters are manufactured in the USSR.

Each planter has one or two hoppers or several separate boxes for the seeds. A seeding mechanism feeds the seeds at a uniform rate from the hopper or boxes to seed spouts. Shares form furrows in the soil, and the seeds are deposited in the furrows. Covering devices deposit soil in the furrows and level the surface of the field. Some planters have stirrers located in the hopper; the stirrers prevent the seeds from sticking together in clumps and ensure better feeding of the seeds to the seeding mechanism. In broadcasters, a flat distributing device is mounted behind the seeding mechanism; the seeds fall uniformly from the device onto the field. The working elements, that is, the seeding mechanisms and stirrers, are rotated by a direct drive (in mounted planters) or by a support-wheel drive (in trailer-type planters) using chain or gear drives. Foreign planters use similar engineering designs.

In the USSR other types of planters are also used for planting crop seeds. They include combination planter-plows, planter-cultivators, and planter-stubble plows. Planter-plows are equipped with a plow body, seed hoppers with seeding mechanisms, and seed spouts. The machines simultaneously plow and deposit seeds in the furrows formed by the plow body. Planter-cultivators are designed to work soil previously worked by machines without moldboards; they are also able to plant seeds in stubble land. They simultaneously sow, loosen the soil, cut weeds, deposit mineral fertilizer in the rows, and turn over the seeded rows. Planter-stubble plows have stubble disks and spool-type seeding mechanisms with seed spouts. The seeds pass through the spouts into furrows formed by the disks and are later covered with soil.

REFERENCE

Karpenko, A. N., and A. A. Zelenev. Sel’skokhoziaistvennye mashiny, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1968.

planter

A permanent, ornamental container to receive planted pots or boxes, often nonmovable and integral with the finish of a building.
References in periodicals archive ?
When temperature changes are rapid and there is sufficient moisture to expand the planting medium, the planter may crack completely.
Wave planter Coming in a range of colours, the Wave planter from Dunnes Stores is a garden staple.
Henry's planter was initially powered by a team of workhorses and later by a tractor.
Early sowing tools included sharpened sticks, antler tines, and even flaked rocks that were used much like we use a modern dibble (dibber in some references) to open holes in the soil to a particular depth, into which we drop a seed--or several seeds, planter style.
The original jab planter was a manually operated seed planter made of wood.
Borlikoski, of Hadley Path, previously took on the task of caring for a planter near their home, according to Mr.
Make a front and back for each planter box, then set them upright and join them with interlocking 2x4 pieces (Photo 3), again attaching them from the inside.
This lightweight planter is a good choice for lighter soils.
Libby seems puzzled that Dunbar did not always punish runaways, though he sometimes did so harshly; yet an entirely inflexible regime would have encouraged full-scale rebellion and every successful planter knew when to give way.
Found in most apartment buildings and multistory condominium complexes, courtyard planters have much in common, exposure-wise, with certain patios and balconies of people who live in houses.
But in 1975 we began a new market by re-pioneering folding row crop planters for easier hauling and transporting in response to a customer who asked for a planter that would fold horizontally.