plaster

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plaster

1. Brit, Austral, and NZ an adhesive strip of material, usually medicated, for dressing a cut, wound, etc.

Plaster

A mixture of lime or gypsum, sand, Portland cement and water to produce a paste-like material which can be applied to the surfaces of walls and ceilings and which later sets to form a hard surface.

daubing

A rough coating of plaster given to a wall by throwing plaster against it.

intonaco

The fine finish coat of plaster made with white marble dust to receive a fresco painting.

pargetting

A decorative feature in which flat wet plaster is ornamented by patterns either scratched or molded into it; sometimes decorated with figures either in low relief or indented.

rendering

A coat of plaster applied directly to an interior wall or stucco on an exterior wall; a perspective or elevation drawing of a project or portion thereof with artistic delineation of materials, shades, and shadows.

scagliola

Plaster work that imitates stone, in which mixtures of marble dust, sizing, and various pigments are laid in decorative figures routed into the surface.

shikkui

A plaster, mortar, stucco, or whitewash, made from a mixture of lime and clay and having the consistency of glue, used in traditional Japanese construction.

Plaster

 

a medicinal form in which substances are supplied for external application. Plasters melt or soften at body temperature and consist of such pliable substances as wax, paraffin, rosin, and rubber; sometimes medicines are added. Some plasters are used to protect the skin from external irritants or to hold bandages in place. Others have a specific therapeutic purpose; for example, keratolytic plasters are used to treat corns, lead plasters are used to treat furuncles and carbuncles, bactericidal plasters are used for purulent wounds, and pepper plasters are used in the treatment of such conditions as radiculitis and neuralgia. Plasters also include various adhesives that evaporate to form an elastic film on the skin, for example, collodion, Kleol, and the glue BF-6.

plaster

[′plas·tər]
(materials)
A plastic mixture of various materials, such as lime or gypsum, and water which sets to a hard, coherent solid.

Plaster

A plastic mixture of solids and water which sets to a hard, coherent solid and which is used to line the interiors of buildings. A similar material of different composition, used to line the exteriors of buildings, is known as stucco. The term plaster is also used in the industry to designate plaster of paris.

Plaster is usually applied in one or more base (rough or scratch) coats up to ¾ in. (1.9 cm) thick, and also in a smooth, white, finish coat about &frac116; in. (0.16 cm) thick. The solids in the base coats are hydrated (or slaked) lime, sand, fiber or hair (for bonding), and portland cement (the last may be omitted in some plasters). The finish coat consists of hydrated lime and gypsum plaster (in addition to the water). See Mortar

plaster

Usually a mixture of gypsum or lime with sand and water, producing a paste-like material that is applied in the plastic state, usually over lath fastened to a surface such as a wall or ceiling, or sometimes directly onto brick; it forms a hard surface when the water it contains evaporates. In some remote early settlements, when lime or gypsum was not available, a so-called plaster of fine white clay mixed with chopped straw was sometimes troweled onto a surface to produce a smooth finish on a wall or ceiling. Cow hair, cow dung, and/or chopped straw often was added to the plaster mixture to increase its mechanical strength when it dried. Gypsum later supplanted lime as the plaster of choice because of its superior properties. Also See mud plaster, ornamental plaster, plaster of paris, and stucco.
References in classic literature ?
If our mishap were one of those that are cured with a couple of plasters, it would not be so bad; but I am beginning to think that all the plasters in a hospital almost won't be enough to put us right.
Miss Jenny repaired to the kitchen, scissors in hand, found the brown paper and found the vinegar, and skilfully cut out and steeped six large plasters.
We entered it, and found the trap-door which led to the staircase, but we had great difficulty in raising it, because the prince had fastened it down underneath with the plaster he had brought with him.
So close on the heels of this as to seem in- stantaneous came a thud behind me, a clash of glass, a crash and rattle of falling masonry all about us, and the plaster of the ceiling came down upon us, smashing into a multitude of fragments upon our heads.
In the centre of the cell, in a circle traced with a fragment of plaster detached from the wall, sat a man whose tattered garments scarcely covered him.
Having procured mortar, sand, and hair, with every possible precaution, I prepared a plaster which could not be distinguished from the old, and with this I very carefully went over the new brickwork.
Athos introduced the bar into this crack, and soon large pieces of plaster yielded, rising up like rounded slabs.
These last words were in Greek, and at the same instant the man with a convulsive effort tore the plaster from his lips, and screaming out 'Sophy
Here he had nailed up shelves for his books, built himself a box-sofa out of boards and a mattress, laid out his papers on a kitchen-table, hung on the rough plaster wall an engraving of Abraham Lincoln and a calendar with "Thoughts from the Poets," and tried, with these meagre properties, to produce some likeness to the study of a "minister" who had been kind to him and lent him books when he was at Worcester.
The sides are daubed with a smooth white plaster, and tastefully frescoed aloft and alow with disks of camel-dung placed there to dry.
There remains to-day but a very imperceptible vestige of the Place de Grève, such as it existed then; it consists in the charming little turret, which occupies the angle north of the Place, and which, already enshrouded in the ignoble plaster which fills with paste the delicate lines of its sculpture, would soon have disappeared, perhaps submerged by that flood of new houses which so rapidly devours all the ancient façades of Paris.
The assistant had left the front shop for an instant, when he heard a crash, and hurrying in he found a plaster bust of Napoleon, which stood with several other works of art upon the counter, lying shivered into fragments.