Plateau

(redirected from plateaus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

plateau,

elevated, level or nearly level portion of the earth's surface, larger in summit area than a mountainmountain,
high land mass projecting conspicuously above its surroundings and usually of limited width at its summit. Although isolated mountains are not unusual, mountains commonly form ranges, comprising either a single complex ridge or a series of related ridges.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and bounded on at least one side by steep slopes, occurring on land or in oceans. Some plateaus, such as the Deccan of India and the Columbia Plateau of the NW United States, are basaltic and were formed as the result of a succession of lava flows covering hundreds of thousands of square miles that built up the land surface. Others are the result of upward folding; still others have been left elevated by the erosion of adjacent lands. Plateaus, like all elevated regions, are subject to dissection by erosion, which removes greater amounts of the upland surface. Low plateaus are often agricultural regions, while high plateaus are usually fit chiefly for stock grazing. Many of the world's high plateaus are deserts. Other notable plateaus are the Colorado Plateau of the W United States, the Bolivian plateau in South America, and the plateaus of Anatolia, Arabia, Iran, and the Tibet region of China.

Plateau

 

an elevated plain with an even or undulating, slightly dissected surface and separated by clearly distinguishable scarps from the adjacent country. The following are distinguished: (1) structural plateaus, which are composed of horizontally bedded rock strata; (2) volcanic, or lava, plateaus, in which the irregularities of the former relief have been capped with lava; (3) denudation plateaus, which are uplifted denudation plains, such as peneplains and abrasion plains; and (4) mountainous plateaus, which are intermontane depressions filled with the weathering products of the surrounding mountain ranges.


Plateau

 

a US scientific station in Eastern Antarctica, located in the interior of the continent, in the western part of the Sovetskoe Plateau. The station is on the surface of an ice sheet, 3,624 m above sea level, and 1,000 km from Kosmonavtov Sea. Plateau Station was in operation from February 1966 through January 1969. It conducted aerometeorological, glaciological, and geophysical observations and served as a base for field research in the adjacent regions.

plateau

[pla′tō]
(electronics)
The portion of the plateau characteristic of a counter tube in which the counting rate is substantially independent of the applied voltage.
(geography)
An extensive, flat-surfaced upland region, usually more than 45-90 meters (150-300 feet) in elevation and considerably elevated above the adjacent country and limited by an abrupt descent on at least one side.
(geology)
A broad, comparatively flat and poorly defined elevation of the sea floor, commonly over 60 meters (200 feet) in elevation.

plateau

a wide mainly level area of elevated land

Plateau

a state of central Nigeria, formed in 1976 from part of Benue-Plateau State: tin mining. Capital: Jos. Pop. (including Nassarawa state): 3 671 498 (1995 est.). Area (including Nassarawa state): 58 030 sq. km (22 405 sq. miles)
References in classic literature ?
The half-breed was descending on the farther side of the pinnacle; but before he could reach the ground Lord John had run along the edge of the plateau and gained a point from which he could see his man.
We had been natives of the world; now we were natives of the plateau.
And so it is that I have spent nearly the whole of this our first night upon the plateau writing up our experiences by the light of a single candle-lantern.
If there were a high tree near the edge of the plateau we might drop a return bridge across, but there is none within fifty yards.
He added constraining the age, spatial extent, and magnitude of ancient topography has a profound effect on how we understand the construction of mountain ranges and high plateaus, such as those in Tibet and the Altiplano region in Bolivia.
Eleven villages and 44 plateaus are settled within the KaE*kar Mountains National Park, but the magic of the Ayder plateau is distinct.
Polar bear denning habitat, caribou forage, carbon storage, and wetland drainage control provided by peat plateaus will be affected if post-Little Ice Age warming continues.
However, there are some predictable plateaus that children reach in this transition.
This is an upland area that has been cut off by the valleys of the Trent, Severn and Avon and their tributaries, and which has been split into the South Staffordshire and East Warwickshire plateaus by the valleys of the lower Tame and Blythe rivers.
Masking rules, effective masking, masking plateaus, and insert earphones should be used routinely to achieve proper masking and to avoid under-and overmasking problems.
Most of the research examining plateaus has focused on its negative outcomes, including absenteeism (e.
The device was found to not be of standards-quality; so only guideline properties needed for this particular experiment were measured (shapes of the QHR plateaus and longitudinal voltages [V.